BioImmersion -- Therapeutic Food Supplements

Welcome Friends,

We invite you to contribute articles & research, thoughts & poems, analysis & solutions; to publish and converse with old and new friends, fellow world citizens, dedicated to bring peace into the chaos of the globe we call home. We have seeded the blog with some articles and thoughts to get the conversation going. The categories on the right will expand as our entries and foci evolve. Lets start writing and publishing!

Contact us about publishing to the blog: publish@bioimmersion.com.

  • Endotoxemia effect on weight gain

    Dear Friends

    What is the correlation between processed foods, endotoxemia, and weight gain?

    Cani and associates (2008) found that bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) levels set the tone of insulin sensitivity and the onset of obesity and diabetes. An increased gut permeability allowed for the passage of LPS through the gut wall into the systemic circulation.  Thus, lowering plasma LPS concentration could be a potent strategy for the control of metabolic diseases.

    LPS are large molecules that are found in the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, and elicit strong immune responses in animals.

    I'll discuss a handy protocol below based on some exciting fiber and probiotic research.

    The following diagram from Cani (2008)graphically spells out the chain of events.

    Leaky Gut Cascade

     Food Science

    "This graph shows that changes in the gut microbiota controls endotoximia, inflammation, and associated disorders by a mechanism that increases intestinal permeability" (Cani, 2008).

    Cani (2007, 2007a, 2008, 2009) demonstrated in their research that adding to the diet soluble fibers such as inulin (containing oligofructose chains) stimulates the growth of Bifidobacteria sp. which caused a reduction in gut permeability, thereby reducing the levels of LPS systemically, and resulted in weight loss and reduced metabolic disorders.

    A Therapeutic Food protocol for adding bifidobacteria and fiber (inulin) for the reduction and prevention of Obesity and Diabetes:

    Pick one of these excellent sources for daily dosaging.

    Direction:  Pick from any of these three products of probiotics, which contain large amounts of bifidobacteria and inulin.

    Bibliography

    • Cani et al. (2009). Changes in gut microbiota control inflammation in obese mice through a mechanism involving GLP-2 driven improvement of gut permeability. Gut; 58(8): 1091-1103.
    • Cani et al. (2008). Changes in gut microbiota control metabolic endotoxemia-induced inflammation in high-fat induced obesity and diabetes in mice, Diabetes; 57:1470-81.
    • Cani et al. (2007). Metabolic endotoxemia initiates obesity and insulin resistance. Diabetes; 56:1761-72.
    • Cani et al. (2007a). Selective increases of Bifidobacteria in gut microflora improve high-fat-diet-induced diabetes in mice through a mechanism associated with endotoxaemia. Diabetologia; 50: 2374-83.

    Sincerely yours,

    Seann Bardell

    We have developed our products based on scientific research and/or the practical experience of many healthcare practitioners.  There is a growing body of literature on food based nutrition and supplements and their application in support of our health. Please use our products under the advisement of your doctor.

    Green Facts:

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    Which country in the world has the highest percentage of obese citizens?
    The Kingdom of Tonga with 68.7% obesity, and over 30% diabetes.  Their daily diet, an exceedingly high fatty corn beef, along with high starch sweet potatoes.  For snacks the Tongans love to frequently munch on lamb flap which contain 50% fat.  See Matoto et al. (2014). Burden and spectrum of disease in people with diabetes in Tonga. Public Health Action; 4: S44-S49.
  • Bifidobacteria and reduction of Obesity

    Dear Friends

    Is there a correlation between obesity and low levels of bifidobacteria?

    Cani and associates (2007, 2007a, 2008, 2009) found a clear correlation between the bifidogenic power of oligofructose, and the importance of maintaining healthy levels of bifidobacterial populations for the reduction of obesity and diabetes.

    An incredible chain of events happens when we eat a high fat diet. First, the gut flora changes, as seen in reduction in levels of Bifidobacteria, causing an increase in GI tract permeability. Increased permeability then allows for more LPS absorption, which brings about endotoxemia, a rise in inflammation, and the all too known manifestation of the metabolic disorders of obesity and diabetes.

    Cani et al. found bifidobacteria and oligofructose (the prebiotic inulin) reduce and prevent obesity and diabetes.

    Therapeutic Food protocol to support the reduction and prevention of Obesity and Diabetes:

    Direction:  Pick from any of these three synbiotic products, all of which contain large amounts of bifidobacteria and inulin (oligofructose).  A synbiotic product contains probiotic and prebiotic.

    Bibliography

    • Cani et al. (2009). Changes in gut microbiota control inflammation in obese mice through a mechanism involving GLP-2 driven improvement of gut permeability. Gut; 58(8): 1091-1103.
    • Cani et al. (2008). Changes in gut microbiota control metabolic endotoxemia-induced inflammation in high-fat induced obesity and diabetes in mice, Diabetes; 57:1470-81.
    • Cani et al. (2007). Metabolic endotoxemia initiates obesity and insulin resistance. Diabetes; 56:1761-72.
    • Cani et al. (2007a). Selective increases of Bifidobacteria in gut microflora improve high-fat-diet-induced diabetes in mice through a mechanism associated with endotoxaemia. Diabetologia; 50: 2374-83.

     

    Sincerely yours,

    Seann Bardell

    We have developed our products based on scientific research and/or the practical experience of many healthcare practitioners.  There is a growing body of literature on food based nutrition and supplements and their application in support of our health. Please use our products under the advisement of your doctor.

     

    Green Facts:

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    Jamie Oliver's Food Revolution is rolling out again and more powerfully than ever.  They're launching a new hub—your go-to-place for daily updates, new information and stories from around the world.
  • Garlic Douche: an ancient art

    Dear Friends

    An old and natural practice to treat vaginal yeast infections is the vaginal douche using a good collection of lactic acid bacteria, such as the Lactobacillus species found within our Original Synbiotic formula, along with a clove of freshly reacted garlic in warmish water. The following protocol makes this an easy process:

    We've seen in our April 24th Forward Thinking and earlier in the April 12th newsletter that according to current research certain Lactobacillus species taken orally with garlic can be a very effective protocol for treating both vaginosis and candidiasis respectively.  Click on their links to see these references.

    The Art of Douche: for Candidiasis and Vaginosis Support

     

    Direction:  First, pour the whole garlic clove powder from one 400mg capsule into 2 cups of water, stir and let the garlic react for a minute as the allicin forms.  Then mix in 1 to 2 tsp of the Original Synbiotic.  That's it.  Make this your douching ingredients. Douche for 2 to 6 days. Wash carefully the outer area after douching.

    Bibliography

    • Cohain, JS. (2003). How to Treat a Vaginal Infection with a Clove of Garlic. Midwifery Today; Issue 38.
    • Drago et al. (2007). Activity of a Lactobacillus acidophilus-Based Douche for the Treatment of Bacterial Vaginosis. Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine; 13(4): 435-438.

    Sincerely yours,

    Seann Bardell

    We have developed our products based on scientific research and/or the practical experience of many healthcare practitioners.  There is a growing body of literature on food based nutrition and supplements and their application in support of our health. Please use our products under the advisement of your doctor.

     

    Green Facts:

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    "We can change climate change—join us and spread the word!  We'll keep you posted on the film and more ways you can help."
    The future of our climate is in crisis.  Watch this trailer on the film by charles Ferguson:  It's Time to Choose.
  • Bacterial Vaginosis Support

    Dear Friends

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is the most common cause of vaginal symptoms among women.  According to NHANES, data collected between 2001–2004, 29.2% of women ages 14–49 in the United States have BV.  84% of these women with are asymptomatic (Koumans, 2007). Women with BV have an increased risk of miscarriage, preterm labor and delivery, and postpartum infections.

    Diagnosis via vaginal swab (wet mount), whiff test, vaginal pH, oligonucleotide probe of DNA of bacteria present are standard. Bacterial vaginosis usually causes the vaginal pH to rise above 4.5 due to the microbial species present. Diagnosis of BV is difficult because of its complex polymicrobial nature indicative of dysbiosis.

    BV has high relapse rates and associated complications.  BV diagnosis includes a decrease in vaginal lactobacilli species and increase in the anaerobes population of microbes, including, most commonly Gardnerella vaginosis or A.vaginae (Shipitsyn,2013).  Vaginal bacterial communities differ dramatically between healthy patients and patients with BV, with G. vaginalis present in over 90% of BV cases (Verstraelen & Swidsinski, 2013).  G. vaginalis is up to 70% of asymptomatic healthy women. When G. vaginalis biofilms form they can establish synergistic relationships with other pathogenic anaerobes.

    A Therapeutic Food protocol for Bacterial Vaginosis Support

    • Cranberry Pomegranate Synbiotic: 2-3 capsules bid to tid
    • Beta High Potency Synbiotic Glucan: 1-2 tsp at night before bed in water.
    • Garlic, organic: 1-2 capsules 1-tid
    • Be Regular: 1-2 servings as needed for regularity.
    • Phyto Power: 1-2 capsules bid to tid.

    Food Science

    Probiotics

    • The probiotic species Lactobacillus are the more common normal vaginal flora that help to protect the vagina against infection by maintaining a normal vaginal pH through lactic acid fermentation of glucose and glycogen and hydrogen peroxide production (Steece, 2011).
    • A Cochrane review (2005) noted 2 studies that reported a beneficial effect of probiotics in the treatment of BV.  In one study cure rates for BV treated with Lactobacilli at 30 days were 60% (P = 0.004) and 88% (P < 0.005), more than double the effect of controls.  Another trial reported a 35% reduction in recurrent episodes of BV compared with placebo (Barrons, 2008).
    • Reid et al (2001) found that of the 60% of women with asymptomatic Bacterial Vaginosis as diagnosed by a Nugent scoring, and 90% of symptomatic women with BV reverted to normal after 28 days of taking oral Lactobacillus species.  7 out of 11 women with symptomatic BV converted to normal after one month on the probiotics.
    • A clinical trial by Karkut G (1984) found that 80% of women with nonspecific vaginitis who used an intravaginal lactobacillus preparation had improvement or resolution of symptoms.
    • A controlled trial by Shaleev (1996) of women with recurrent BV or vaginal candidiasis that ate 5 ounces of yogurt containing live Lactobacillus acidophilus daily had more than a 50% reduction in recurrences, while women who consumed pasteurized yogurt that did not contain the bacteria had only a slight reduction.
    • An in vitro study by McMillian et al (2011) found that biofilms mimicking aerobic vaginosis, BV and UTI with Escherichia coli, Atopobium vaginae and Gardnerella vaginalis  were affected by lactobacillus probiotic administration. Lactobacillus killed E. coli and secreted products of L. rhamnosus GR-1 decreased E. coli cell density, and increased cell death. BV biofilms with Lactobacilli infiltrated BV biofilms and caused bacterial cell death, while Metronidazole produced holes in the biofilm but did not eradicate the organisms.

    Note:  In terms of the probiotic organisms the Cranberry Pomegranate Synbiotic contains L. acidophilus, L. casei (both important beneficial vaginal organisms) and B. longum; and the Beta Glucan Synbiotic contains L. acidophilus, L. rhamnosus, L. plantarum, S. thermophilus and B. longum.  Click their links here to see the full formulas.

    Garlic

    • A randomized clinical trial in Iran by Mohammadzadeh et al. (2014) of 120 married women aged 18 to 44 with BV by Amsel’s were treated with either garlic tablet or oral metronidazole for seven days. Amsel’s criteria were significantly decreased after treatment with garlic or metronidazole (70% and 48.3%, respectively; P < 0.001). Therapeutic effects of garlic on BV were similar to that of metronidazole (63.3% and 48.3%, respectively; P = 0.141). There were significant differences between the two treatment groups in terms of side effects; metronidazole was associated with more complications (P = 0.032).

     

    Bibliography

    • Barrons, R, Tassone, D. (2008). Use of Lactobacillus Probiotics for Bacterial Genitourinary Infections in Women: A Review. Clinical Therapeutics, 30(3): 453-468.
    • Chierico, FD, Vernocchi, P, Bonizz,i, L, Carsetti  R., Castellazzi,,B, Dallapiccola, AM, de Vos,, W, Guerzoni, ME, Manco, M, Marseglia, GL, Muraca M, Roncada, P, Salvatori, G, Signore, F, Urbani, A, Putignani, L (2012).  Early-life gut microbiota under physiological and pathological conditions: The central role of combined meta-omics-based approaches. Journal of Proteomics Translational Proteomics, 15(3):4580-4587.
    • Koumans EH, Sternberg M, Bruce C, McQuillan G, Kendrick J, Sutton M, Markowitz LE. (2007)  The prevalence of bacterial vaginosis in the United States, 2001-2004; associations with symptoms, sexual behaviors, and reproductive health.Sex Transm Dis, 34(11):864-9.
    • Mcmillan, A, Dell, M, Zellar, MP, Cribby, S, Martz, S, Hong, E Fu, J, Abbas, A, Dang, T, Miller, W, Reid, G. (2011). Disruption of urogenital biofilms by lactobacilli. Colloids and Surfaces B: Biointerfaces, 86:58-64.
    • Mohammadzadeh, F., Dolatian, M., Jorjani, M., Alavi Majd, H., & Borumandnia, N. (2014). Comparing the Therapeutic Effects of Garlic Tablet and Oral Metronidazole on Bacterial Vaginosis: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial. Iranian Red Crescent Medical Journal, 16(7), e19118. http://doi.org/10.5812/ircmj.19118
    • Money, D. (2005). The laboratory diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis. The Canadian Journal of Infectious Diseases & Medical Microbiology, 16(2), 77–79.
    • Reid G, Beuerman, D, Heinemann C, Bruce, AW. (2001). Probiotic Lactobacillus dose required to restore and maintain a normal vaginal flora. FEMS Immunology and Medical Microbiology; 32: 37-41.
    • Shalev E, Battino S, Weiner E, et al. (1996) Ingestion of yogurt containing Lactobacillus acidophilus compared with pasteurized yogurt as prophylaxis for recurrent Candidal vaginitis and bacterial vaginosis. Arch Fam Med, 5:593–6.
    • Shipitsyna, E., Roos, A., Datcu, R., Hallén, A., Fredlund, H., Jensen, J. S., Unemo, M. (2013). Composition of the Vaginal Microbiota in Women of Reproductive Age – Sensitive and Specific Molecular Diagnosis of Bacterial Vaginosis Is Possible? PLoS ONE, 8(4), e60670. http://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0060670.
    • Steece, R. (2011). Bacterial Vaginosis, Vulvovaginal Candidiasis, and Trichomoniasis. Society of Armed Forces Medical Laboratory Scientists (SAFMLS). Presented on March 28-31, 2011 New Orleans, Louisiana.

     

    Sincerely yours,
    Seann Bardell
    We have developed our products based on scientific research and/or the practical experience of many healthcare practitioners.  There is a growing body of literature on food based nutrition and supplements and their application in support of our health.  Please use our products under the advisement of your doctor.

     

    Green Facts:

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    Biomimicry says Happy Earth Day to you from all over the world.
    Meet the nature-inspired innovators shaking up our food system.
  • 10% Gift to celebrate Earth Day

    Dear Friends

    In honor of Earth Day we are offering 10% off on any BioImmersion orders today and through the weekend.  Simply call 425-451-3112 to place those orders.

    Let's celebrate Earth Day!!!   Here's the link: Earth Day — April 22.

    The year of the first Earth Day was 1970, and it gave voice to an emerging consciousness that we all need to come together to make critical changes in our environmental practices. Here we are, it's 2016, and this reality is clearer and more urgent than ever.

    The Earth Day Network is working to protect our planet every day of the year, with tens of thousands of partners across 192 countries.  We're at a critical moment in the fight to defend the health of our planet. (The Earth Day Network: Join the Movement)

    Sincerely yours,
    Seann Bardell
    We have developed our products based on scientific research and/or the practical experience of many healthcare practitioners.  There is a growing body of literature on food based nutrition and supplements and their application in support of our health.  Please use our products under the advisement of your doctor.

     

    Green Facts:

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    More on the Earth Day Celebration through the Rocky Mountains Institute's video discussion of the importance results from the Paris Climate Summit.
  • UTI Support

    Dear Friends

    Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs) are the most common non-intestinal infection worldwide (August, 2012). It is estimated that 60% of women have had at least one UTI, 30% have recurrent UTIs.

    Recurrent infections occur in 35 to 53% of women that are treated for UTI within 12 months with conventional antibiotic treatments and incur a cost of approximately 2.47 billion dollars in 2000 for women in the United States (Kranjčec, 2014).

    Conventional therapy to prevent recurrent UTIs are long-term antibiotic prophylaxis or postcoital antibiotics, which present with a high reoccurrence rate, lead to antibiotic resistance, increase the risk of candida and dysbiosis and disrupt the microbiome of women with potential deleterious side effects.

    A Therapeutic Food protocol for UTI:

    • Cranberry Pomegranate Synbiotic- 2-3 capsules BID to TID, preventatively.
    • Garlic, organic- 1-2 capsules BID to TID.
    • For bowel regularity, choice of:
    • Beta Glucan High Potency Synbiotic- tsp. at night before bed in water.
    • Be Regular- 1-2 tbs as needed for regularity.
    • For liver and antioxidant support:
    • Phyto Power- 1-2 capsules BID to TID.

     

    Food Science

    Cranberry juice and cranberry extracts were traditionally used for the prevention and treatment of UTIs in early Native American medicine.  A review of the literature on cranberry extract, probiotics, and D-mannose all have clinical evidence to support their use in the prevention of UTIs and are found synergistically in Cranberry Pomegranate Synbiotic to prevent UTIs without contributing to the dybiosis and antibiotic resistance produced by standard antibiotic therapy.

    • Cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon, Ericaceae), cranberry extracts and proanthocyanidins, and the sugar found in high concentrations in cranberries, D-mannose, inhibit the adherence of E. coli, the bacteria that is most commonly found to contribute to UTIs, to the urinary tract wall. The condensed tannins also prevent uropathogenic phenotypes of P-fimbriated (mannose-resistant) E. coli from adhering to the urinary tract according to its German Commission E monograph, a peer-reviewed monograph used for therapeutic application of natural medicines in Europe.
    • Cranberry juice has been shown to have antibacterial effects against Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Proteus mirabilis. A survey of 400 Norwegian women by Nordeng (2004) found that cranberry was the most commonly used herb during pregnancy with no adverse effects with regular consumption.
    • A review by Oppel (2008) concluded that cranberry is effective in preventing UTIs in pregnant and breastfeeding women, except for those at risk of developing kidney stones because of its high oxalate content.
    • A study by Kontiokari T, et al. (2001) reviewed research that found cranberry extract 500 mg twice daily of cranberry extract containing 9 mg proanthocyanidins reduced the odds of bacteriuria and pyuria by 42% compared to placebo, reduced the risk of developing a UTI in high-risk patients compared to placebo (62.8% vs 84.8%) when taking 300-600 mL or more of cranberry juice.
    • In Kontiokari T, et al. (2001) randomized clinical study 150 women were randomly assigned to receive 50 mL of cranberry-lingonberry juice daily, and found the number of patients who had recurrent infections was significantly lower in the cranberry-lingonberry group than in the lactobacillus or control groups (12 compared to 21 and 19). The authors concluded that the cranberry-lingonberry drink was associated with a 20 percent reduction in absolute risk of UTI compared with control participants.
    • A 6-month intervention trial published in Nutraceutical Business & Technology (2011) sponsored study by a cranberry extract company showed that a daily dose of 500 mg of cranberry extract in 165 women with a history of recurrent UTIs reduced the UTI recurrence by 15%.
    • A randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind study conducted in Japan by Takahashi et al. (2013) found that women that drank (125 mL) of cranberry juice before going to sleep for 24 weeks had a significant decrease in the rate of relapse of UTI ( 29.1% versus 49.2%) compared to the control group.
    • A clinical trial (Beerepoot, 2011) of 221 premenopausal women showed that continuous antibiotics were more effective in preventing recurrent UTIs than 500 mg cranberry capsules taken twice daily, at the expense of emerging antibiotic resistance.
    • A retrospective review of clinical studies by Miceli et; al (2014) on cranberry products strongly support their prophylactic use in young and middle-aged women.
    • A randomized controlled study by Bonetta (2012) of 370 patients with prostate cancer undergoing irradiation to the pelvis found a significant reduction in UTIs (8.7%) compared with controls (24.2%) accompanied by a statistically significant reduction in urinary tract symptoms (dysuria, nocturia, urinary frequency, urgency), suggesting a generally protective effect of cranberry extract on the bladder mucosa.


    D-Mannose
    binds to the type 1 pili of enteric bacteria blocking their adhesion to uroepithelial cells, and reduction in bacteriuria levels have been confirmed in in vivo animal model. In laboratory studies D-mannose components had prebiotic activity in promoting non-pathogen probiotics and thus may additionally contribute to the prevention of recurrence of UTIs by addressing the dysbiosis common in patients with recurrent UTIs and Intercystial cystitis.

    • A randomized study by Kranjčec (2014) of 308 women with history of recurrent UTI and acute cystitis that took antibiotics previously were randomly allocated to three groups. The first group (n = 103) received prophylaxis with 2 g of D-mannose powder in 200 ml of water daily for 6 months, the second (n = 103) received 50mg Nitrofurantoin daily, and the third (n = 102) did not receive prophylaxis. 31.8 % had recurrent UTI: 15 (14.6%) in the D-mannose group, 21 (20.4%) in Nitrofurantoin group, and 62 (60.8%) in no prophylaxis group. Patients in D-mannose group had a significantly lower risk of recurrent UTI episode during prophylactic therapy compared to patients in no prophylaxis group. Patients in D-mannose group had a significantly lower risk of side effects compared to patients in Nitrofurantoin group.

     

    Probiotics have been shown to be clinically effective in UTI treatment and to prevent antibiotic-induced dysbiosis. 

    • A randomized, controlled, clinical study of 252 postmenopausal women in the Netherlands (Beerepot, MAJ, et al. 2012) with recurrent UTIs showed oral doses of 1 billion colony-forming units of Lactobacillus species were as effective as 12 months of prophylaxis with trimethoprim- sulfamethoxazole, 480 mg without leading to antibiotic resistance associated with antibiotic use.
    • Another study by Reid, Hammond, and Bruce (2003) showed that taking probiotics at 10 billion of L rhamnosus and L Fermentum RC14 from the day starting antibiotics and for 21 days subsequently significantly reduced the risk of developing bacterial vaginosis.
    • Lactobacillus species were shown to inhibit candida albicans and Gardneralla vaginalis species in vitro.
    • Other studies that have shown small benefit with using L. thermophilus and L Bulgaricus, and L. GG (which is a rhamnosus sp.) to prevent BV nor vaginal candidiasis.
    • A clinical study of 100 premenopausal women with a history of at least one UTI by Stapelton (2011) found a significant reduction in the incidence of recurrent UTIs in women receiving intravaginal lactobacillus as compared to those in the placebo group.


    Garlic
    has been researched extensively for its antibacterial properties that do not contribute to antibiotic resistance.

    • Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that colonizes urinary catheters, forms biofilms, and is responsible for causing persistent and recurrent nosocomial catheter-associated urinary tract infections (UTIs) with increased morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised patients. Antimicrobial resistance to P. aeruginosa is common. In a mouse model of UTIs by Harjai (2010) oral treatment with garlic significantly lowered renal bacterial counts and protected mouse kidney from tissue destruction. In vitro data showed decreased elaboration of virulence factors and reduced production of quorum-sensing signals by P. aeruginosa in the presence of fresh garlic extract.
    • Recurrent UTIs with a positive E. coli culture, not improving with antibiotics are common due to the development of antibiotic resistance. Monsour et. al (2014) found that an alternative therapeutic regimen based on parsley and garlic, L-arginine, probiotics, and cranberry tablets showed a significant health improvement and symptoms relief without recurrence for more than 12 months.


    Be Regular-
    A contributing factor to UTIs is constipation and dysbiosis of the colonic bacteria.  Including prebiotic and fiber found in Be Regular helps to prevent recurrent UTI infections by promoting non-pathogenic commensal probiotics and the elimination of pathogenic bacteria from the stool.

    Phyto Power is included in the protocol because it is high in phytonutrients that aid in elimination of toxins that contribute to dysbiois and rose hips that are high in Vitamin C to protect against oxidative damage as part of the metabolic pathways.

    Bibliography:

    • August, S. L., & De Rosa, M. J. (2012). Evaluation of the Prevalence of Urinary Tract Infection in Rural Panamanian Women. PLoS ONE; 7(10), e47752. http://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0047752
    • Beachey EH. (1981). Bacterial adherence: adhesion-receptor interactions mediating the attachment of bacteria to mucosal surface. J Infect Dis;143:325-345.
    • Beerepoot MA, ter Riet G, Nys S, van der Wal WM, de Borgie CA, de Reijke TM et al. (2011). Cranberries vs. antibiotics to prevent urinary tract infections: a randomized double-blind noninferiority trial in premenopausal women. Arch Intern Med; 171(14): 1270–1278.
    • Beerepoot et al. (2012). Lactobacilli vs. Antibiotics to Prevent Urinary Tract Infections: A Randomized, Double-blind, Noninferiority Trial in Postmenopausal Women. Arch Intern Med; 172(9):704-712.
    • Blumenthal et al. (1998). The Complete German Commission E Monographs Therapeutic Guide to Herbal Medicines. Austin, TX: American Botanical Council; Boston: Integrative Medicine Communications.
    • Bonetta A, Di Pierro, F. (2012).  Enteric-coated, highly standardized cranberry extract reduces risk of UTIs and urinary symptoms during radiotherapy for prostate carcinoma.  Dove Medical Press; 4: 281-286.
    • Dugoua et al. (2008). Safety and efficacy of cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) during pregnancy and lactation. Can J Clin Pharmacol; 15( 1): e80-e86. Epub Jan 18, 2008.
    • Harjai, K., Kumar, R. and Singh, S. (2010), Garlic blocks quorum sensing and attenuates the virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. FEMS Immunology & Medical Microbiology, 58: 161–168. doi: 10.1111/j.1574-695X.2009.00614.x
    • Kontiokari T, et al. (2001). Randomised trial of cranberry-lingon-berry juice and Lactobacillus GG drink for the prevention of urinary tract infections in women. BMJ; 322: 1571–3.
    • Kranjčec, B, Papeš, D, Altarac, S. (2014). D-mannose powder for prophylaxis of recurrent urinary tract infections in women: a randomized clinical trial. World Journal of Urology, 32(1):79-84.
    • Lloyd, Ian,B.Sc(Pharm), C.H. (2014). Cranberry and prevention of UTIs. Pharmacy Practice; 1(10): 95. Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com/docview/1623072718?accountid=26484
    • Mansour et al. (2014). Efficient and Cost-Effective Alternative Treatment for Recurrent Urinary Tract Infections and Interstitial Cystitis in Women: A Two-Case Report. Case Reports in Medicine ; Article ID 698758 : 4 pages. doi:10.1155/2014/698758.
    • Micali et al. (2014).  Cranberry and recurrent cystitis: more than marketing? Crit Rev Food Sci Nutr; 54(8): 1063–1075.
    • Nordeng H, Havnen GC. (2004). Use of herbal drugs in pregnancy: a survey among 400 Norwegian women. Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf; 13(6): 371-380.
    • Oppel, M. (2008). Cranberry Effective in Treating UTIs during Pregnancy and Lactation. Herbalgram; (80): 31.
    • Reid, G., Hammond, JA, Bruce, AW. (2003). Effect of Lactobacilli Oral Supplement on the Vaginal Microflora of Antibiotic Treated Patients: Randomized Placebo-controlled Study. Nutraceutials and Food; 8: 1-4.
    • Shalev E, Battino S, Weiner E, et al. (1996). Ingestion of yogurt containing Lactobacillus acidophilus compared with pasteurized yogurt as prophylaxis for recurrent Candidal vaginitis and bacterial vaginosis. Arch Fam Med; 5: 593–6.
    • Stapleton AE, Dziura J, Hooton TM, Cox ME, Yarova-Yarovaya Y, Chen S et al (2012). Recurrent urinary tract infection and urinary Escherichia coli in women ingesting cranberry juice daily: a random- ized controlled trial. Mayo Clin Proc; 87(2):143–150 .
    • Takahashi , S, Hamasuna, R., Yasuda, M, Arakawa, S., Tanaka, S, Ishikawa, S, Kiyota, H, Hayami, H, Yamamoto, S. (2013).  A randomized clinical trial to evaluate the preventive effect of cranberry juice (UR65) for patients with recurrent urinary tract infection. Journal of Infection and Chemotherapy; 19 (1): 112-117.
    • Terris MK, Issa MM, Tacker JR. (2001). Dietary supplementation with cranberry concentrate tablets may increase the risk of nephrolithiasis. Urology; 57(1): 26-29.
    • Whole cranberry powder prevents recurrent UTIs women. (2011). Nutraceutical Business & Technology, 7(5), 10. Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com/docview/928970880?accountid=26484)
     As I promised last week, within our Forward Thinking presentation of a Candidiasis Support protocol, over the next few weeks we are giving you successful recipes developed and used by Dr. Artemis Morris; and this week we have her UTI protocol using the Therapeutic Foods.
    Sincerely yours,
    Seann Bardell
    We have developed our products based on scientific research and/or the practical experience of many healthcare practitioners.  There is a growing body of literature on food based nutrition and supplements and their application in support of our health.  Please use our products under the advisement of your doctor.

    Green Facts:

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    Watch this truly inspiring TED talk by Ron Finley—The Gangsta Gardener.   Ron feeds the hungry, and brings real food to the people that need it most.
    He also will be a speaker in the 2016 Food Revolution Summit.
  • Candidiasis Support

    Dear Friends

    Did you know that nosocomal infections of multiply resistant pathogens kill more patients each year than breast cancer and HIV combined?  The war on pathogens with antibiotics is not a war that we are winning.  Picking a fight with natural selection is not a smart thing to do (Read, 2012).

    The human gut contains a vast ecosystem of microorganisms, a flora that must be ecologically managed well by us, in order to be truly healthy.  The overuse and misuse of antibiotics in medicine, the practice of giving cattle low growth promoting doses of antibiotics has created grave gastrointestinal problems.  There are better ways to manage the ecosystem within our gut and control the overgrowth of pathogens, without antibiotics.

    We are proud to have Dr Artemis Morris on our board.  She is a great physician and professor as well. Over the next couple weeks I will present for you her Therapeutic Food protocols to treat Candida/Yeast infections, UTIs, Bacterial Vaginosis, Interstitial Cystitis and Diverticulosis, as well as her protocols for increasing fertility and enhancing neonatal health.  Here is Dr. Morris's protocol for:

    Candida/Yeast Syndrome Support

    Candidiasis is the most common opportunistic yeast infection (Martins, 2014).  Candida albicans is an opportunistic pathogen that resides as a harmless commensal in the gut, genitourinary tract and skin (Berman, 2012).

    Candida in nonpathogenic concentrations can be protective to the organism against other pathogens and only becomes an opportunistic pathogen when the host has reduced immune competence or an imbalance of the competing bacterial microflora- dysbiosis.

    A Therapeutic Food protocol for Candida/Yeast Syndrome:

    • Remove the candida by killing the yeast
      1. Garlic, organic- 1-2 capsules TID.
      2. Chlorella- 2-3 BID to TID.
    • Crowd out the yeast with commensal organisms that also support the immune system.  Choose from the following probiotic and prebiotic formulas:
      1. Supernatant Synbiotic- 1-2 capsules BID.
      2. Cranberry Pomegranate Synbiotic- 1-2 capsules BID.
      3. Beta Glucan Synbiotic- 1-2 tsp. at night before bed in water.  Use if candida includes gastrointestinal symptoms consistent with a disrupted biofilm and the patient is not sensitive to oats.
      4. Original Synbiotic- 1-2 tsp. daily.
      5. High ORAC Synbiotic- 1-2 capsules BID.
      6. No.7 Systemic Booster- 1-2 tsp. daily.
      7. Be Regular- 1-2 tbs. daily.
    • Repair the damage and provide antioxidant support for the immune system and mitochondrial function.
      1. Phyto Power- 2 capsules daily.

     

     

    Food Science:

    Candida is best addressed by supporting the host’s immune function, as well as, decreasing the colony forming units and disrupting the biofilm of the Candida overgrowth.  Anti fungal and antimicrobial treatment frequently results in reoccurrence and there is an increased trend in antimicrobial and antifungal resistant strains of Candida that have been shown to respond well to herbal and natural alternatives.

    Garlic- Allicin, a metabolite of raw crushed garlic, is a potent antifungal against Candida species and can be as effective as antifungal drugs.  Allicin blocks lipid synthesis of yeast by inhibiting protein synthesis and hyphae formation of Candida.  A clinical study of garlic supplementation for 2 weeks before the subjects cycle showed a greater self-reported improvement in symptoms compared to the placebo, and non-statistically significant decrease in mean vaginal colony counts after 4 days of supplementation (Watson et al. 2014).

    Chlorella addresses toxic body burden that may contribute to Candida overgrowth, promotes probiotic colonization and produces pepsin and chlorophyllase, and stimulates the growth of lactic acid bacteria in promoting optimal digestive health.  An in vitro study (Annamalai, 2015) showed that aqueous self-assembled gold nanoparticles from an aqueous extract of Chlorella vulgaris were antibacterial against Candida albicans and Staphylococcus aurous species.

    Probiotics crowd out yeast and pathogenic bacteria as part of their mechanism when taken orally for at least 28 days (Reid, et al. 2003).  Probiotics in combination with antifungals for oral candidiasis improved clinical outcomes and decreased the detection of Candida in saliva compared with antifungals alone (Li et al. 2013).  Probiotics are effective in preventing enteric Candida colonization in preterm neonates; reduced the prevalence of candidaemia and candiduria in critically ill children.  Probiotics reduce colonization of candida by activating mucosal immunity, stimulating cytokine production, IgA secretion, phagocytosis, producing inhibitory substances to pathogens, compete for nutrients with pathogens, inhibit pathogenic attachment, inhibit activity of antimicrobial toxin, have a trophic effect on intestinal mucosa, and modulate innate and adaptive immunity (Kumar, S. 2014).  A clinical study of HIV-positive women by Williams (2000) found that Lactobacillus acidophilus vaginal suppositories taken were as effective as the anti-fungal Clotrimazole at reducing the risk of experiencing a episode of Candida vaginitis.

    Cranberry juice extract, high in D-mannose and proanthocyanadins inhibits adherence of E. coli to the uroepithelial cells of the bladder wall and by producing antibacterial hipuric acid; Cranberry extract is antibacterial against Pseudomona aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, and salmonella sp,; antifungal against Candida albicans.  Patel et al. (2011) found Candida glabrata, Candida lusitaniae, Candidia krusei and Cryptococcus neoformans were significantly susceptible to treatment with cranberry proanthocyanidin factions in a broth microdilution assay, with MICs as low as 1 mcg/mL.  Rand et al. (2014) showed cranberry proanthocyanadins reduced biofilm formation of all C. albicans studied and were additive in effect with traditional antifungals.  Feldman (2012) found that cranberry extract inhibited oral candida biofilm formation and adhesion to oral epithelial cells in vitro and inhibited inflammatory cytokines stimulated by candida.  A clinical study by Lee (2010) of women that ingested 900mg of cranberry showed urinary inhibition of E. coli, K. pneumonia, and C. albicans 1-6 hrs after ingestion and 67% of subjects showed urinary inhibition against K. pneumonia on Day 2 of ingestion.

    Be Regular supports the elimination of toxins and promotes optimal bowel function.  Be Regular provides prebiotics, promotes commensal probiotic growth, addresses toxin removal, Herxheimer reaction clearing and prevention of re-inoculation with pathogenic bacteria.

    Phyto Power provides the provides the antioxidant, antiinflammatory, antimicrobial power of the wildcrafted rosehip (3 species), blueberry (4 species) and dandelion (4 species)- e.g. the antifungal power of rosehip's high concentration of ellagic acid, the anti C. albicans bioflim powere of the pterostilbene from the blueberry (Li et al., 2014), and the detoxifying ability of the dandelion.

    Bibliography:

    • Annamalai, J, Nallamuthu, T. (2015). Characterization of biosynthesized gold nanoparticles from aqueous extract of Chlorella vulgaris and their anti-pathogenic properties. Appl Nanosci, 5:603–607.
    • Berman, J. (2012). Candida Albicans. Current Biology, 22(16): R620-R622.
    • Feldman, M. Tanabe, S., Howell, A, Grenier, D. (2012). Cranberry proanthocyanidins inhibit the adherence properties of Candida albicans and cytokine secretion by oral epithelial cells.  BMC Comp and Alt Med, 12 (6):1-12.
    • Kumar, S. (2014). Safety and efficacy of probiotics in Candida colonization and infection: Where do they stand. Mycoses, 57;320.
    • Kunal D. Patel, Frank J. Scarano, Miwako Kondo, Robert A. R. Hurta, and Catherine C. Neto (2011). Proanthocyanidin-rich Extracts from Cranberry Fruit (Vaccinium macrocarpon Ait.) Selectively Inhibit the Growth of Human Pathogenic Fungi Candida spp. and Cryptococcus neoformans. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 59 (24), 12864-12873.
    • Lee, YL, Najm WI, Thrupp, L, Baron, S, SHanbrom, E, Cesario, T. (2010). Anti-microbial Activity of Urine after Ingestion of Cranberry: A Pilot Study. eCAM, 7(2):227-232.
    • Li et al. (2014) In Vitro and In Vivo Activities of Pterostilbene against Candida albicans Biofilms. Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy; 58(4):2344-2355.
    • Magarinos, HLE, Sahr, C, Selaive, SDC, Costa, ME, FIguerola, FE, Pizarro, OA. (2008).In vitro Inhibitoty Effect of Cranberry (Vqccinium macrocarpum Ait) Juice on Pathogenic Microorganisms. Applied Biochemistry and Microbiology, 44 (3):300–304.
    • Martins, N., Ferreira, I. C. F. R., Barros, L., Silva, S., & Henriques, M. (2014). Candidiasis: Predisposing Factors, Prevention, Diagnosis and Alternative Treatment. Mycopathologia, 177(5-6), 223–240. http://doi.org/10.1007/s11046-014-9749-1
    • Minich D. M, Bland L. S. (2007). Acid-alkaline balance: role in chronic disease and detoxification. Altern Ther Health Med, 13(4): 62-5.
    • Rane, HS, Bernardo, SM, Howell, AB, Lee, SA. (2014). Cranberry-derived proanthocyanidins prevent formation of Candida albicans biofilms in artificial urine through biofilm- and adherence-specific mechanism. J Antimicrob Chemother, 69:428-436.
    • Reid, G., Charbonneaus D., Erb, J., Kochanowski, B., Beuerman, D., Poehner, R., Bruce, A.W.  (2003). Oral use of Lactobaccilus Rhamnosis GR-1 and L. fermentum RC-14 significantly alters vaginal flora:A randomized, placebo-controlled trial in 64 healthy women. FEMA Immunology and Medical Microbiology, 35:131-134.
    • Watson, CJ, Grando, D, Fairley, CK, Chondros, P, Garland, SM, Myers, SP, Pirotta, M. (2013). The effects of oral garlic on vaginal candida colony counts: a randomised placebo controlled double-blind trial. BJOG, 121:498-506.
    • Williams A, Yu C, Tashima K, et al. (2000). Weekly treatment for prophylaxis of Candida vaginitis. Presentation. 7th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic infections. Foundation for Retrovirology and Human Health in collaboration with the (US) National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. January 30–February 2.

     

    Sincerely yours,
    Seann Bardell

     

    We have developed our products based on scientific research and/or the practical experience of many healthcare practitioners. There is a growing body of literature on food based nutrition and supplements and their application in support of our health.  Please use our products under the advisement of your doctor.

    Green Facts:

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    "Disease superbugs are mutating faster than we can develop treatments."   (TED talk by Evolutionary Biologist Andrew Read of Penn State).  See below:
  • Cardiovascular Support with Phyto Power

    Dear Friends

    In industrialized countries isolated systolic hypertension (ISH) increases steeply with age. Many Americans over the age of 60 have ISH, which is increasingly recognized as a cardiovascular risk. Several studies have shown the strong association between ISH and stroke, kidney failure, cardiovascular morbidity and mortality (Gasowski et al, 2002; Vaccarino et al, 2001).
    Reversing or stabilizing the increased arterial stiffness associated with age and disease by targeting any or all of its causes provides of a number of promising new approaches to treatment of systolic hyertension and its sequel, the main causes of mortality and morbidity (Greenwald SE, 2007).

    Therapeutic Food supplements magnify the protective benefits of key phytonutrients that support the reduction of ISH.

    Therapeutic Food protocol to support protection from ISH:

    • Phyto Power, wild crafted- 2 capsules BID.
    • Be Regular- 2 heaping tbl taken as a meal replacement three times weekly.
    • No. 7 Systemic Booster- 1 tsp at breakfast
    • Beta Glucan High Potency Synbiotic- 1 heaping tbl BID before 2 largest meals.
    • Chromium, Bio-organic with Beet- 1 capsule BID.

     

    Food Science:

    Research has shown that the catechin family of flavonoids provide protective phytonutrients particularily from catechin, epicatechins and epigallocatechin gallate.

    Endothelial dysfunction, a prognostically relevant key event in atherosclerosis, is characterized by a decreased bioactivity of nitric oxide (NO) and impaired flow-mediated vasodilation (FMD).  Schroeter et al., (2006) showed in healthy male adults that the ingestion of flavanol-rich cocoa was associated with acute elevations in levels of circulating NO species, an enhanced FMD response of conduit arteries, and an augmented microcirculation.

    Nagao et al., (2007) observed, in a protocol sample of 240 subjects, that green tea extract high in catechins reduces body fat and cardiovascular risks including a decrease in systolic blood pressure. Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol was also decreased to a greater extent in the catechin group.

    Lorenz et al., (2007) investigated the effect of milk in preventing the beneficial effects of tea relative to vascular protection, and found that casein in milk binds to catechins inhibiting their beneficial functioning as antioxidants.  Their conclusion was that milk counteracts the favourable health effects of tea on vascular function.

    The wilds of Alaska provide an amazing environment for powerful plants and berries— fertile volcanic ash soil, and a harsh environment that challenges plants to put out high levels of phenols (e.g. flavonoids) to protect themselves.

    Notice the different between an Alaskan rosehip and the typical Europe rosehip (dog-rose) in terms of their phytonutrient load.

    Flavonoids

    • Quercetin- 10.50 (Alaskan rosehip) verses 1.05 (European rosehip) in mg/g.
    • Hyperoside- 3.03 verses 4.30
    • Kaempferol- 1.62 verses 0.00
    • Isoquercitin- 0.78 verses 3.51
    • Naringenin- 0.26 verses 0.15
    • Rutin- 0.16 verses 0.67
    • Nothofagrin- 0.26 verses 0.07
    • Luteolin- 0.02 verses 0.01
    • Biochanin A- 0.02 verses 0.00

     

    Catechins

    • Catechin- 72.5 verses 35.70
    • Epicatechin- 67.50 verses 33.70
    • gallocatechin- 0.93 verses 0.86
    • epicatechin gallate- 0.45 verses 0.15
    • catechin gallate- 0.25 verses 0.02.

     

    Organic Acids

    • Ellagic acid- 48.30 verses 5.25
    • Gallic acid- 7.85 verses 0.14
    • p- Coumaric acid- 1.54 verses 0.16
    • Protocatachuic acid- 0.97 verses 0.18
    • Caffeic acid- 0.38 verses 0.00
    • Chlorogenic acid- 0.30 verses 0.05.
    • Salicylic acid- 0.22 verses 0.14
    • Fefulic acid- 0.06 verses 0.09

     

    Vitamins

    • Vitamin C- 25.00 verses 10.00
    • Vitamin B3- 1.09 verses 0.19
    • Vitamin B2- 0.08 verses 0.11
    • Vitamin B1- 0.03 verses 0.01
    • Vitamin B6- 0.01 verses 0.00.

     

    Carotenoids

    • Lycopene- 4.89 verses 2.98
    • b-Carotene- 1.15 verses1.53
    • Lutein- 0.21 verses 0.00
    • Zeaxanthin- 0.17 verses 0.19.

    Phyto Power's Alakan Rosehip provides high amount of catechins.  Two capsules gives one the equivalent of two squares of dark chocolate in catechins without the sugar.

    Bibliography:

    • Dower et al. (2015). Effects of the pure flavonoids epicatechin and quercetin on vascular function and cardiometabolic health: a randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover trial. Am J Clin Nutr; 101(5): 914-21.
    • Engler at al. (2004). Flavonoid-rich dark chocolate improves endothelial function and increases plasma epicatechin concentrations in healthy adults. J Am Coll Nutr; 23:197-204.
    • Greenwald SE. (2007). Ageing of the conduit arteries. J Pathol; 211(2): 157-172.
    • Lorenz et al. 2007. Addition of milk prevents vascular protective effects of tea. European Heart Journal; 28(2): 2219-2223.
    • Nagao et al. (2007). A green tea extract high in catechins reduces body fat and cardiovascular risks in humans. Obesity; 15: 1473-1483.
    • Schroeter et al. (2006). Epicatechin mediates beneficial effects of flavanol-rich cocoa on vascular function in humans. PNAS; 103:1024-1029.

     

    Sincerely yours,
    Seann Bardell

    We have developed our products based on scientific research and/or the practical experience of many healthcare practitioners. There is a growing body of literature on food based nutrition and supplements and their application in support of our health.  Please use our products under the advisement of your doctor.

    Green Facts:

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    "Global agriculture is a huge problem and it needs a huge solution.  This is the core of where the action needs to be for fixing our planet."
  • Obesity/Diabetes and Inflammation

    Dear Friends

    Chronic tissue inflammation goes hand-in-hand for people suffering from obesity and diabetes.  The inflammatory cytokine Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha (TNF-a) is elevated in the plasma and adipose tissue of these individuals.  TNF-a induces the expression of inflammatory genes such as IL-6, IL-1B, IL-8 and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and the secretion of IL-6, IL-8 and MCP-1.  Hence, chronic inflammation.

    Chuang et al, 2010 research aim was to examine the extent to which quercetin and resveratrol prevent inflammation or insulin resistance in primary cultures of human adipocytes.  What they found was that quercitin is equally or more effective than resveratrol in attenuating TNF-a mediated inflammation and insulin resistance in fat cells.

    Therapeutic Food protocol to support reduction of inflammation:

    • Phyto Power, wild crafted- 1-2 capsules BID.


    Food Science
    :

    Phyto Power contains a powerhouse of anti-inflammatory phytochemicals including quercitin and resveratrol.  Supplying Alaskan wildcrafted, high phenolic actives produce— namely three species of rosehips (whole fruit seeds and all), four species of blueberry (high and low bush) and four species of dandelion (with roots, leaves and flowers).

    The wilds of Alaska provide an amazing environment for powerful plants and berries— fertile volcanic ash soil, and a harsh environment that challenges plants to put out high levels of phenols (e.g. flavonoids) to protect themselves.

    Notice the different between an Alaskan rosehip and the typical European rosehip (dog-rose) in terms of their phytonutrient load.

    Flavonoids

    • Quercetin- 10.50 (Alaskan rosehip) versus 1.05 (European rosehip) in mg/g.
    • Hyperoside- 3.03 versus 4.30
    • Kaempferol- 1.62 versus 0.00
    • Isoquercitin- 0.78 versus 3.51
    • Naringenin- 0.26 versus 0.15
    • Rutin- 0.16 versus 0.67
    • Nothofagrin- 0.26 versus 0.07
    • Luteolin- 0.02 versus 0.01
    • Biochanin A- 0.02 versus 0.00


    Catechin

    • Catechin- 72.5 versus 35.70
    • Epicatechin- 67.50 versus 33.70
    • Gallocatechin- 0.93 versus 0.86
    • Epicatechin gallate- 0.45 versus 0.15
    • Catechin gallate- 0.25 versus 0.02


    Organic Acids

    • Ellagic acid- 48.30 versus 5.25
    • Gallic acid- 7.85 versus 0.14
    • p- Coumaric acid- 1.54 versus 0.16
    • Protocatachuic acid- 0.97 versus 0.18
    • Caffeic acid- 0.38 versus 0.00
    • Chlorogenic acid- 0.30 versus 0.05
    • Salicylic acid- 0.22 versus 0.14
    • Fefulic acid- 0.06 versus 0.09


    Vitamins

    • Vitamin C- 25.00 versus 10.00
    • Vitamin B3- 1.09 versus 0.19
    • Vitamin B2- 0.08 versus 0.11
    • Vitamin B1- 0.03 versus 0.01
    • Vitamin B6- 0.01 versus 0.00


    Carotenoids

    • Lycopene- 4.89 versus 2.98
    • b-Carotene- 1.15 versus 1.53
    • Lutein- 0.21 versus 0.00
    • Zeaxanthin- 0.17 versus 0.19

    So as you can see there is a large quantative difference, which directly corresponds to therapeutic efficacy.

    Quercitin may help protect against heart disease and cancer as well.. Quercetin can also help stabilize the cells that release histamine in the body and thereby have an anti-inflammatory and antihistamine effect.

    Bibliography:

    • Chuang et al. (2010). Quercetin is equally or more effective than resveratrol in attenuating tumor necrosis factor-(alpha)-mediated inflammation and insulin resistance in primary human adipocytes. Am J Clin Nutr; 92(6): 1522-21.
    • Dower et al. (2014). Effects of the pure flavonoids epicatechin and quercetin on vascular function and cardiometabolic health: a randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover trial. Am J Clin Nutr; 101(5): 914-21.
    Sincerely yours,
    Seann Bardell

    We have developed our products based on scientific research and/or the practical experience of many healthcare practitioners. There is a growing body of literature on food based nutrition and supplements and their application in support of our health. Please use our products under the advisement of your doctor.

    Green Facts:

    Globe_Home 3

    Picture a food system designed by nature.  We love the Biomimicry Institute. Click on this link, you will be inspired and amazed.  They truly are on the leading edge of real solutions for the future.
  • Cancer Support (continued)

    Dear Friends

    In this weeks Forward Thinking we will continue with our cancer support protocol focusing on Phyto Power and Beta Glucan High Potency Synbiotic.

    Last week we looked at vegetables, and research siting their most potent anti-cancer fighters. This week we are getting into the intelligent use of fruits, fibers and probiotics for preventive cancer support.

    A Therapeutic Food protocol to support our ability to prevent and aid in treating cancer:

    • Garlic, organic- 1 to 2 capsules daily (more is okay, but not enough so that your skin has a garlic odor)
    • Cruciferous Sprout Complex 3-4 capsules daily, preferably on an empty stomach
    • Phyto Power, wild crafted- 1-2 capsules daily
    • Beta Glucan High Potency Synbiotic- 2 tablespoons daily

     

    Food Science:

    Berry fruits have beneficial effects against several types of human cancers; and the evidence is overwhelming.  Their anticancer potential benefits are related to their polyphenols (flavonoids, proanthocyanidins, gallotannis, phenolic acids), stilbenoids, lignans and triterpennoids (Seeram NP., 2008).

    Their benefits mediated through to:

    • Counteract, reduce and repair damage from oxidative stress and inflammation.
    • Regulating carcinogen and xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes, transcription and growth factors, inflammatory cytokines, and cellular signaling pathways of cancer cell proliferation, apoptosis and angiogenesis.
    • Sensitize tumor cells to chemotherapeutic agents by inhibiting pathways that lead to treatment resistance.
    • Provide protection from therapy-associated toxicities.


    Phyto Power- each capsule contains 3 species of Alaskan wildcrafted rosehips (the whole fruit and seeds), four species of wildcrafted blueberry (fruit >95% w/w and leaves and stems <5% w/w), and four species of wildcrafted dandelions (aerial parts 90% w/w, roots 10% w/w and flower).

    The environment from which a plant comes has a tremendous effect on its nutrient potency.
    When plants are farmed organically their nutrient values tend to be higher, especially when we are considering the micronutrients.  They don't have the crutch of relying on an herbicide or pesticide for their protection and they must produce more of their own phyto-chemicals to fend off invaders and survive.

    Alaska is a challenging environment.  The growing season has intense sun 20 hours a day. Yet, the ground is still partially frozen due to the lattitude.  It is a mountainous region of the world where the wild soil is very rich in volcanic ash—resulting in an abundance of minerals and organic nutrients for the plants.  Berries tend to be tart and are loaded with phenolic actives—the very phytochemicals that we need for protection from chronic diseases.

    Rosehip derives its orange color from its abundance of lycopene, a carotenoid known for providing protection from cancer.  For example, prospective and retrospective epidemio-logical studies indicate an inverse relationship between lycopene intake and prostate cancer risk (vanBreemen RB., Paklpvoc M., 2008).

    Scientist investigated the efficacy of rosehip extracts in preventing cell proliferation of three human glioblastoma cell lines.  Each line treated demonstrated a signficant decrease in cell proliferation. The rosehip decrease was equal to or better than the decrease of cell proliferation observed when inhibitors of the MAPK or AKT signaling pathways were utilized (Cagle et a.. 2012).

    Rosehip is loaded with Vitamin C, organic acids, catechins and other flavonoids to help provide strong support for cancer protection.

    Blueberry are rich in anthocyanins, which exhibit strong antioxidant and anti- inflammatory properties all important for cancer protection.  They have been shown to reduce COX-2, NFkB in the blood, as well as isoprostane, a marker for lipid oxidation.

    Anthocyanins from blueberry have demonstrated the ability to inhibit not only the intiation stages of chemically induced carcinogenesis but also the later promotion and proliferation stages (Lila, 2004).

    What researchers, McAnulty et al. discovered is that blueberries are strong stimulators for the body's production the NK cells.  It is the job of natural killer cells to provide immunosurvellance for tumors and their eradication (McAnulty et al., 2011; Waldhauer & Steinle., 2008).

    Dandelion roots, leaves and flowers providing a diversity of health benefits.  The roots stimulate bile flow, the leave provide a rich supply of chlorophyll, the flowers the pigment lutein, a powerful antioxidant.

    Beta Glucan High Potency Synbiotic provides 33 billion cfu/tbl of certified stains of pedigreed probiotic with Therapeutic Foods in a synbiotic formula of L. acidophilus, B.longum, L. rhamnosus, L. plantarum, S. thermophilus and 5 grams of patented oat bran (75%) with high levels of beta glucan (10%), whole red beet root (15%) and inulin derived for chicory fiber (10%).

    Prebiotic:

    Reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species play an important role in the pathogenesis of many diseases.  Beta-glucans participate in the processes of repair, metabolism and detoxification.  They counteract the pathological conditions of ROS and RNS (Jurczynska et al., 2012).

    Beta-glucans, naturally occurring polysaccharides, are present as constituents of cell wall of cereal grains, mushrooms, algae, or microbes including bacteria, fungi, and yeast.  Since Pillemer et al. first prepared and investigated zymosan in the 1940s and others followed with the investigation in the 60s and 70s, researchers have well established the significant role of B-glucans on the immune system relative to cancer treament, infection, immunity, and restoration of damaged bone marrow (Yoon TJ., 2013).

    It is well established that glucans enhance the efficacy of anti-cancer and anti-infection immunotherapy, both in clinical and experimental conditions (Vetvicka V., 2013).

    Probiotic:

    There is a large body of evidence that suggests probiotic reduce the inflammatory response and oxidative stress, as well as increase the expression of adhesion proteins with the intestinal epithelium, reducing intestinal permeability.  The net result of which is the reduction of chronic inflammation, a leading cause for cancer initiating and developing (Bordalo et al., 2016; Kasinska & Drzeworski, 2015; Idzior-Walu & Walus-Miarka, 2015; Yan et al., 2015; Gomes et al., 2014).  These selected strains are particularly successful in this endeavor.

    Finally, our other probiotic formulas can be considered here in this protocol as well.  The High ORAC Synbiotic provides along with probiotics a collection of powerful berry extracts. So to does our Cranberry Pomegranate Synbiotic and our No. 7 Systemic Booster.  I have provided the links for them here.

    Bibliography:

    • Abduli Razis AF, Noor NM. (2013). Cruciferous vegetables: dietary phytochemicals for cancer prevention. Asian Pac J Cancer Prev; 14(3): 1565-70.
    • Anand et al. (2008). Cancer is a preventable disease that requires major lifestyle changes. Pharm Res; 25(9): 2097-2116.
    • Bhuvaneswari V, Nagini S. (2005). Lycopene: A Review of its Potential as an Anticancer Agent. Current Medicinal Chemistry—anti-Cancer Agents; 5(6): 627-635.
    • Boivin et al. (2009). Antiproliferative and antioxidant activities of common vegetables: A comparative Study. Food Chemistry; 112(20): 374-380.
    • Bordalo et al. (2015). Clinical Application of Probiotic in Diabetes Mellitus:  Therapeutics and New Perspectives. Crit Rev Food Sci Nutr; 1015 Oct 25: 0.
    • Cao et al. (2014). Garlic-derived allyl sulfides in cancer therapy. Anticancer Agents Med Chem;14(6):793-9.
    • Cagle et al. Effect of Rosehip (Rosa canina) Extracts on Human Brain Tumor Cell Proliferation and Apoptosis. Journal of Cancer Therapy. 3(5): 13 pages.
    • Grooms et al. (2013). Dietart Fiber Intake and Cardiometabolic Risks among US Adults: NHANES 1999-2919. Am J Med; 126(12): 1059-1067.
    • Idzior-Walu B, Walus-Miarka M. (2015). Is now the time for probiotics in diabetes management? Pol Arch Med Wewn; 125(11): 797-8.
    • Jurczynska et al. Beta-glucan as a natural anticancer agent. Europe PMC; 33(196): 217-220.
    • Kasinska MA, Drzewoski J. (2015). Effectiveness of probiotics in type 2 diabetes: a meta-analysis. Pol Arch Med Wewn; 125(11): 803-13.
    • Lila MA. (2004). Anthocyanins and Human Health:  An in Vitro Investigative Approach. J Biomed Biotechnol; 2004(5): 306-313.
    • McAnulty et al. (2011). Effect of blueberry ingestion on natural killer cell counts, oxidative stress, and inflammation prior to and after 2.5 h of running. Appl Physiol Nutr Metab; 36(6): 976-84.
    • Melino S., Sabelli R, Paci M. (2011). Allyl sulfur compounds and cellular detoxification system: effects and perspectives in cancer therapy. Amino Acids;41(1):103-12.
    • Nepravishta et al. (2012). Oxidative species and s-glutathionyl conjugates in the apoptosis induction by allyl thiosulfate. FEBS J; 279(1): 154-67.
    • Romagnolo DF, Davis CD, Milner JA. (2012). Phytoalexins in cancer prevention. Front Biosci (Landmark Ed); 17: 2035-58.
    • Seeram NP. (2008). Berry fruits for cancer prevention: current status and future prospects. J Agric Food Chem; 56(3): 630-5.
    • Steinkellner et al. (2001). Effects of cruciferous vegetables and their constituents on drug metabolizing enzymes involved in the bioactivation of DNA-reactive dietary carcinogens. Mutation Research/Fundamental and Molecular Mechanisms of Mutagenesis; 480-481: 285-297.
    • van Breemen RB, Pajkovic M. (2008). Multitargeted therapy of cancer by lycopene.  Cancer Letters; 269(2): 339-351.
    • Vetvocla  V. (2013). Synthetic oligossacharides: clinical application in cancer therapy. Anticancer Agents Md Chem; 13(5): 720-4.
    • Walhauer I, Steinle A. (2008). NK cells and cancer immunosurveillance. Oncogene; 27: 5932-5943.
    • Yan Q, Li X, Feng B. (2015). The efficacy and safety of probiotics intervention in preventing conversion of impaired glucose tolerance to diabetes: study protocol for a randomized, double-blinded, placebo controlled trial of the Probiotics Prevention Diabetes Programme (PPDP). BMC Endocr Discord; 15(1): 74.
    • Yoon et al. 2013. The effects of B-glucans on cancer metastasis. Anticancer Agents Med Chem; 13(5): 699-708.

    Sincerely yours,

    Seann Bardell

    We have developed our products based on scientific research and/or the practical experience of many healthcare practitioners. There is a growing body of literature on food based nutrition and supplements and their application in support of our health. Please use our products under the advisement of your doctor.

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    February is Cancer Prevention Month and The American Institute for Cancer Research provides a great website for support in the fight against cancer.  Check our their site and these ten recommendations for cancer prevention.

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