BioImmersion -- Therapeutic Food Supplements

Welcome Friends,

We invite you to contribute articles & research, thoughts & poems, analysis & solutions; to publish and converse with old and new friends, fellow world citizens, dedicated to bring peace into the chaos of the globe we call home. We have seeded the blog with some articles and thoughts to get the conversation going. The categories on the right will expand as our entries and foci evolve. Lets start writing and publishing!

Contact us about publishing to the blog: publish@bioimmersion.com.

  • SIBO Support

    Dear Friends

    Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth (SIBO) is considered to be part of the larger condition of Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS).

    IBS is known as a chronic, episodic, functional gastrointestinal disorder, characterized by abdominal pain/discomfort and altered bowel habit (constipation, diarrhea or alternating periods of both). It is estimated to affect 10-15% of Western populations, one in seven Americans suffer with this condition (Hungin, 2005)

    The following Therapeutics Food Synbiotics offer support to those who have SIBO.

    Therapeutic Foods probiotic suited for SIBO:

     

    Select one or two of these calming and reparative foods and probiotics.

    Next week we will discuss the merits of the Blueberry Extract to calm and support nerve regeneration.

    Food Science

    Many studies have linked IBS with SIBO through a qualitative basis using breath tests even though quantitative cultures are the hallmark of diagnosis. Pyleris and fellow researchers (2012) used endoscopy to determine the frequency of SIBO in a large number of Greek patients.

    320 subjects enrolled who were diagnosed with IBS according to the Rome II criteria.  SIBO was found in 37.5% of IBS sufferers.  Escherichia coli, Enterococcus spp and Klebsiella pneumoniae were the most common isolates found in patients with SIBO.

    Siebecker and Sandberg-Lewis, co-founders of the SIBO Center for Digestive Health at The National College of Natural Medicine (NCNM), state in their paper (2013), Small Intestine Bacterial Overgrowth: Often-Ignored cause of Irritable Bowel Syndrome, that they have used various multistrain and single probiotics as well as yogurt and cultured vegetables with their SIBO patients with good results.  They consider avoiding prebiotics such as FOS, inulin and GOS as the main ingredient.  However, they also state that these prebiotics may be tolerated in small amounts used as base ingredients.

    Soifer and associates pilot study's (2010) objective was to compare the short-term clinical efficacy of metronidazole vs. a probiotic with SIBO and functional chronic abdominal distension. The study population consisted of 50 patients with chronic abdominal distension (Rome III criteria) and diagnosis of SIBO made by a lactulose H2 breath test.

    The participants were divided into 2 groups, 25 in the metronidazole group and 25 in the probiotic group.  The probiotic group received a blend of L. casei, L. plantarum, S. faecalis and B. brevis.  Both groups went on the same diet, which consisted in reduced consumption of alcohol, legumes, dairy products and leafy green vegetables.

    The results showed that thirteen (52%) subjects receiving metronidazole and twenty (82%) receiving the probiotic referred showed clinical improvement after the treatment.  All the study patients completed treatment.  No adverse events leading to treament discontinuation were observed.

    Their conclusion was that the probiotics used had a higher efficacy that metronidazol and may prove successful in treating SIBO.

    Supernatant Sybiotic: One vegi capsule contains: 15.7 billion CFU of probiotic (L. casei, L. acidophilis, L. bulgaricus, S. thermophilus, B. longum) plus supernatant (inactive cells of L.bulgaricus and S. thermophilus with their metabolites) plus 50mg of inulin as a carrier.

    Cranberry Pomegranate Synbiotic: One vegi capsule contains 15 billion CFU of probiotic (L. casei, L. acidophilus, B. longum) plus cranberry extract, pomegranate extract plus supernatant (inactive cells of L.bulgaricus and S. thermophilus with their metabolites) plus 62.5mg of inulin as a carrier.

    High ORAC Synbiotic: One vegi capsule contains 20 billion of probiotic (L. acidophilus, B.longum) plus blueberry extract, grape and grape seed extract, raspberry and raspberry seed extract, cranberry, strawberry, prune, tart cherry and wild bilberry extract plus 250mg inulin.

    Bibliography

    • Hungin et al (2005). Irritable bowel syndrome in the United States: prevalence, symptoms patterns and impact. Alimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics; 21(11): 1365-1375
    • Pyleris et al. (2012). The Prevalence of Overgrowth by Aerobic Bacteria in the Small Intestine by Small Bowel Culture: Relationship with Irritable Bowel Syndrome. Digestive Diseases and Sciences; 57(5): 1321-1329.
    • Siebecker A, Sandberg-Lewis S. (2013). Small Intestine Bacterial Overgrowth: Often-Ignored Cause of Irritable Bowel Syndrome. Townsend Letter; Feb/Mar 2013.
    • Soifer LO, Peralta D, Dima G, Besasso H. (2010). Comparative clinical efficacy of a probiotic vs. an antibiotic in the treatment of patients with intestinal bacterial overgrowth and chronic abdominal functional distension: a pilot study. Acta Gastroenterol Latinoam; 40(4): 323–7.

     

    Sincerely yours,

    Seann Bardell

    We have developed our products based on scientific research and/or the practical experience of many healthcare practitioners.  There is a growing body of literature on food based nutrition and supplements and their application in support of our health. Please use our products under the advisement of your doctor.

    Green Facts:

    Globe_Home 3

    The Institute of Sustainable Nutrition, located in Connecticutt, has a world vision that people everywhere come to know and enjoy simple, delicious, real-food grown close to home by and with people in their community.  They have a one year hands-on program where you'll explore the science of the human body and its relationship to food, herbs and well-being.
  • Osteoarthritis Support

    Dear Friends

    Rosehips and boron provide significant reduction in pain associated with osteoarthritis (OA).

    Through improved detection methods, OA is proving to be an inflammatory condition where inflammatory pathways are up-regulated with low-level increases in C-reactive protein (Spector, 1997; Abramson, 2004).

    Therapeutic Food recipe to support the reduction and prevention of Osteoarthritis:

     

    Food Science

    Fructo Borate Complex:  In their inital 2011 pilot study research from Scorei et al. sought to determine whether 15 days of dietary supplementation with fructo borate could acutely modulate inflammatory and lipid blood markers in individuals with primary OA.

    Out of 116 initial sujects 60 completed the study as designed.  The aim was to compare the effects of fructo borate to placebo.  The inflammatory biomarkers looked at were C-reactive protein (CRP), fibrinogen (FBR) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR).

    These inflammatory markers were convincing because in all the boron-supplemented participants levels of CRP, FBR and ESR were reduced but not in the ones receiving the placebo.

    If you click on the Fructo Borate Complex link above it will take you to our monograph on this product and the original research conducted on it in Yugoslavia by Miljukovic et al., where they demonstrated significant reduction in pain, swelling and in an increased mobility in affected arthritic joints.  They utilized the WOMAX Index and the Newnham Criteria.

    Phyto Power:  contains three species of wildcrafted Alaskan Rosehips (the whole fruit and seeds), four species of wildcrafted dandelions (aerial parts 90% w/w, roots 10% w/w and flower), and four species of wildcrafted blueberry (fruit >95% w/w and leave and stems < 5% w/w).

    Christensen et al, in their meta-analysis, looked at three studies of 287 OA patients over a 3-month trial and concluded that rosehip powder consistently reduced pain scores and that patients taking the rosehip were twice as likely to respond as the placebo group. In contrast to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and aspirin, rosehip has anti-inflammatory actions that do not have ulcerogenic effects and do not inhibit platelets nor influence the coagulation cascade or fibrinolysis. (Christensen, 2008).

    Wintheri et al. (2005) studied 94 patients with osteoarthritis of the hip or knee to ascertain the effectiveness of rosehip (Rosa canina or dog rose). They conclude rosehip helps to reduce pain, swelling and suffering; alleviate sympotoms of osteoarthritis, and reduce the consumption of rescue medication. The dosing was 5 capsules (500 mg per capsule) BID for 3 months.  (Note: the dog rose is not a strong rosehip, hence the large dosage.)

    High levels of the carotenoid lycopene are found in the Alaska rosehip.  Lycopene has gained attention for its strong antioxidative capabilities and for its potential to play a protective role against a number of chronic diseases, including osteoarthritis (Rao, 2007).

    No. 7 Systemic Booster: contains a higher potency proprietary blend of our pedigreed Bulgarian probiotic bacteria, plus an important fusion of organic whole fruits, berry extracts, chicory root soluble fiber with carefully selected complimentary nutriceuticals (including Vitamin D-3).

    A healthy GI tract microbiome is essential to reducing chronic inflammation throughout the body including in conditions associated with OA (Vitetta, 2013).

    Bibliography

    • Abramson SB. (2004) Inflammation in osteoarthritis. J Rheumatol Suppl; 70: 70-76.
    • Christensen et al. (2008).  Does the hip powder of Rosa canina (rosehip) reduce pain in osteoarthritis patients? — a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Osteoarthritic and Cartilage; 16(9): 965-972.
    • Cohen M. (2012). Rosehip- an evidence based herbal medicine for inflammation and arthritis. Aust Fam Physician; 41(7): 495-8.
    • Miljkovic et al. (2009). Calcium Fructoborate:  plant-based dietary boron for human nutrition. J Diet Suppl;6:211-226.
    • Rao AV, Rao LG. (2007). Carotenoids and human health. Pharmacol Res; 55: 207-216.
    • Scorei RI, Rotaru P. Calcium fructoborate—potential anti-inflammatory agent. Biol Trace Elem Res. 2011
    • Spector et al. (1997).  Low-level increases in serum C-reactive protein are present in early osteoarthritis of the knee and predict progressive disease. Arthritis Rheum; 40(4): 723-727.
    • Vitetta et al. (2013).  The Gastrointestinal Microbiome and Musculoskeletal Diseases:  A Beneficial Role for Probiotic and Prebiotics. Pathogens; 2(4); 606-626.
    • Winther K et al. (2005). A powder made from seeds and shells of a rosehip subspecies (Rosa cnina) reduces symptoms of knee and hip asteoarthritis: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial. Scnd J Rheumatol; 34(4): 302-8.

     

    Sincerely yours,

    Seann Bardell

    We have developed our products based on scientific research and/or the practical experience of many healthcare practitioners.  There is a growing body of literature on food based nutrition and supplements and their application in support of our health. Please use our products under the advisement of your doctor.

    Green Facts:

    Globe_Home 3

    In the USA the boron levels in the soil have dropped considerably over the last 50 years due to our industrialized agricultural practices.  The same can be said where they are exported around the world.  Arthritis is increasing, especially juvenile arthritis in these regions.
    Newnham RE. (1991) Agricultural Practices Affect Arthritis. Nutrition & Health; 7:89-100.
  • Osteoporosis Support

    Dear Friends

    Fractures associated with osteoporosis affect one in three women and one in five men over the age of 50 years, and is largely due to our diet and lack of boron in our soil (Devirian, 2003; Sacco, 2013).

    Fructo Borate ComplexPhyto Power, and No. 7 Systemic Booster work together as an intelligent system of nutrients that signals the body to create healthy bone. This is the necessary power found in food.

    Therapeutic Food recipe to support the reduction and prevention of Osteoporosis:

     

    Food Science

    Macro- and micronutrients contribute to skeletal health by supporting bone matrix production and mineralization.  Of these, calcium, vitamin D and proteins are the most important nutrients for supporting the skeleton (Heaney 1995; Bonjour 2005).

    However, because there is very little boron in the soil, Americans and many people in other developed countries, suffer with osteoporosis, even though the dietary intake of calcium and vitamin D is adequate according to the recommended daily allowances (RDA).

    Three dietary factors, independent of calcium and/or vitamin D, strongly influence bone and mineral homeostasis and long-term bone health. These are carbohydrate-bound boron, as found in Fructo Borate and No 7. Systemic Booster; polyphenol rich foods as found in Phyto Power and No. 7 Systemic Booster; and prebiotic and probiotic as found in No. 7 Systemic Booster.  No 7 also contains supernatant (rich nutients), vitamin D3, and more (for more on nutrients, see McCabe, 2015; Sacco, 2013).

    Fructo Borate Complex: is a complex of calcium ascorbate and carbohydrate bound boron; exactly as it is found in fresh and dried fruits, vegetables and herbs when grown in soils containing boron. Unfortunately, boron is missing in our daily nutrition as industrialized farming has depleted boron from our soil.

    A substantial number of metabolic processes in humans and animals are beneficially affected by physiologic amounts of dietary boron.  Boron enhances bone integrity and reduces the risk of osteoporosis by enhancing Vitamin D-3 and the steroid hormones DHEA and testosterone levels in the blood—all commonly found to be increasingly deficient as we reach our senior years (Villareal 2000; Miljkovic 2002; Laird 2010; Sinnesaelo 2011).

    Miljkovic's research found one months supplementation with fructo-borate (as formulated in our Fructo Borate Complex) increased blood levels of D-3 by 19.6%, testosterone by 29.5% and DHEA-S levels by 56% (Miljkovic 2002).

    Sinnesaelo's reseach demonstrates that testosterone is an important hormone for both bone gain and maintenance in men.  Hypogonodal men have accelerated bone turnover (Sinnesaelo 2011).

    Villareal concluded that DHEA replacement in those elderly women and men who have very low serum DHEA levels can partially reverse age-related changes is BMD (Villareal 2000).

    Laird and researchers found that Vitamin D alone and in combination with calcium appears to have a clear significant effect on bone mineral density (BMD) (Laird 2010).

    Phyto Power:  contains three species of wildcrafted Alaskan Rosehips (the whole fruit and seeds), four species of wildcrafted dandelions (aerial parts 90% w/w, roots 10% w/w and flower), and four species of wildcrafted blueberry (fruit >95% w/w and leave and stems < 5% w/w).

    Alaska wild berries range from 3 to 10 times higher in phytonutrients (such as carotenoids, catechins, flavonoids and other polyphenols) than those grown in the lower latitudes of the United States (Dinstel, 2013).

    High levels of the carotenoid lycopene are found in the Alaska rosehip.  Lycopene has gained attention for its strong antioxidative capabilities and for its potential to play a protective role against a number of chronic diseases, including osteoporosis (Rao, 2007).

    Epidemiological data using various adult populations have demonstrated a positive relationship between the intake levels or serum levels of lycopene and bone mass, bone turnover and/or fracture risk (Sahni, 2009).

    Epidemiological studies have reported reduced risk of hip fractures or higher bone BMD in habitual tea drinkers.  This is due to their catechin family of flavonoids.  Alaskan wild-crafted rosehips are loaded with catechins (Hegarty, 2000).

    Blueberry prevents bone loss in an OVX rat model.  The objective of this study was to explore the bone protective role of blueberry in an OVX rat model.  The researchers' findings indicate that blueberry can prevent bone loss as seen by the increase in BMD and favorable changes in biomarkers of bone metabolism (Devareddy, 2008).

    An ovariectomized rat (OVX) is a female rat whose ovaries have been removed.  This represents the stages of osteoporosis in humans.  The OVX rat model is the approved preclinical model by the FDA for studying how the decline in endogenous estrogen production by the ovaries at menopause leads to postmenopausal osteoporosis and how potential interventions can preserve bone metabolism in this state (Johnston, 2015).

    No. 7 Systemic Booster: contains a higher potency proprietary blend of our pedigreed Bulgarian probiotic bacteria, plus an important fusion of organic whole fruits, berry extracts, chicory root soluble fiber with carefully selected complimentary nutriceuticals (including Vitamin D-3).

    "Bone is an organ that the gut has long been known to regulate through absorption of calcium, the key bone mineral. It is clear that modulation of the gut and its microbiome can affect bone density and strength in humans" (McCabe, 2015).

    The lactic acid producing bacteria, such as found in the No. 7 Systemic Booster, are known to facilitate the acidification of the GI tract mucus membrane enabling absorption of calcium, magnesium, phosphorous and other important minerals for bone health.

    Probiotic organisms produce SCFA as a byproduct of their fermentation of prebiotics such as the inulin, berries, dandelion and other fibers in the Phyto Power and No 7.  Short chain fatty acids (SCFA) can enhance calcium absorption and signal locally in the gut and in the bone in ways that result in decreased osteoclast activity and/or increased osteoblast activity leading to enhanced bone density, structure and strength (McCabe, 2015).

    Bibliography

    • Bonjour JP. (2005). Dietary protein: an essential nutrient for bone health. J Am Coll Nutr; 24(6 Suppl): 526S-36S.
    • Devareddy et al. (2008). Blueberry prevents bone loss in ovariectomized rat model of postmenopausal osteoporosis. JNB; 19(10): 694-699.
    • Devirian TA, Volpe SL. (2003). The Physiological Effects of Dietary Boron. Crit Rev in Food Sci and Nut; 43(2): 219-231.
    • Heaney RP. (1995). Skeletal development and maintenance: the role of calcium and vitamin D. Adv Endocrinol Metab; 6: 17-38.
    • Hegarty VM, May HM, Khaw KT. (2000). Tea drinking and bone mineral density in older women. Am J Clin Nutr; 71: 1003-1007.
    • Johnston BD, Ward WE. (2015). The Ovariectomized Rat as a Model for studying Alveolar Bone Loss in Postmenopausal Women. BioMed Research International; 2015: Article ID 635023, 12 pages.
    • Laird et al. (2010). Vitamin D and Bone Health: Potential Mechanisms. Nutrients; 2(7): PMC3257670.
    • McCabe L., Britton RA., Parameswaran N. (2015). Prebiotic and Probiotic Regulation of Bone Health: Role of the Intestine and its Microbiome. Curr Osteoporos Rep; DOI 10.1007
    • Milijkovic N. (2002). Vitamin D. Steroid Hormone Homeostasis and Calcium Fructo-borate Supplementation. Department of Orthopedic Medicine, University of Novi Sad, Novi Sad, Yugoslavia.
    • Rao AV, Rao LG. (2007). Carotenoids and human health. Pharmacol Res; 55: 207-216.
    • Sacco et al. (2013). Phytonutrients for bone health during ageing. BJCP; 75(3): 697-707.
    • Sahni et al. (2009). Protective effect of total carotenoid and lycopene intake on the risk of hip fracture: a 17-year follow-up from the Framingham Osteopororsis Study. J bone Miner Res; 24: 1086-1094.
    • Sinnesaelo et al. (2011). Testosterone and the Male Skeleton: A Dual Mode of Action. Journal of Osteoporosis; Article IND 130328: 7 pages.
    • Villarea et al. (2000). Effect of DHEA replacement on bone mineral density and body composition in elderly women and men. Clin Endocrinol (Oxf); 53(5): 561-8.

     

    Sincerely yours,

    Seann Bardell

    We have developed our products based on scientific research and/or the practical experience of many healthcare practitioners.  There is a growing body of literature on food based nutrition and supplements and their application in support of our health. Please use our products under the advisement of your doctor.

    Green Facts:

    Globe_Home 3

    "It turns out that an apple a day really can keep the doctor away—especially if she is a cardiologist."
    See Video!  (The Union of Concerned Scientists)
  • Reducing the risk of heart disease

    Dear Friends

    How do we reduce the risk of heart disease? With a plant based diet. See Green Facts below to learn what the World Health Organization (WHO) and Kaiser Permantente say about plant based diets.

    BioImmersion agrees whole-heartedly! Because of our busy lives and toxic environment, our bodies need extra help: a wide variety of the powerful concentrated plant-based whole foods and extracts that go into our Therapeutic Food Supplement range. Each product is individually designed through ongoing research to deeply nourish and combat the growing threats of modern life (Therapeutic Foods).

    A Therapeutic Food recipe for supporting the reduction of Heart Disease:

     

    Food Science

    Beta Glucan High Potency Synbiotic contains probiotic (33 billion cfu/tbl of certified stains of pedigreed L acidophilus, B. longum, L. rhamnosus, L. plantarum, S. thermophilus) and prebiotic (patented oat bran with high levels of beta glucan soluble fiber, whole red beet root and inulin derived from chicory fiber).

    The prebiotic inulin and the probiotic Bifidobacteria, along with the Lactobacillus strains selected support the reduction of endotoxemia, a leading cause of metabolic disorders  such as obesity, diabetes and heart disease (Cani 2007, 2007a, 2008, 2009).

    Whitehead et al. (2014) performed a meta-analysis on 28 randomized controlled trials on the effectiveness of oat bran beta glucans to lower LDL cholesterol.  Oat beta glucan reduced LDL and total cholesterol by 0.25 mmol/L and 0.30 mmol/L respectively at doses of 3g/d.

    Saini (2010) found that the fiber inulin inhibits hepatic lipogenesis (creation of cholesterol), inducing a significant hypotriglyceridemic effect.

    DiRienzo (2014) reviewed 26 clinical studies and two meta-analyses and found amongst others that L. acidophilus plus inulin significantly decrease LDL cholesterol.  Their conclusion was that probiotic intake as a therapeutic lifestyle change can have a positive effect on reduced CHD risk factors.

    Phyto Power contains three species of wildcrafted Rosehips (the whole fruit and seeds), four species of wildcrafted dandelions (aerial parts 90% w/w, roots 10% w/w and flower), and four species of wildcrafted blueberry (fruit >95% w/w and leave and stems < 5% w/w).
    Alaska wild berries range from 3 to 5 times higher in ORAC value than cultivated berries from the lower 48 states. For instance, cultivated blueberries have an ORAC scale of 30. Alaska wild dwarf blueberries measure 85 (Dinstel, 2013).
    Phyto Power's broad array of phytonutrients (catechins, organic acids, vitamins, flavonoids, carotenoids, anthocyanins, polyphenols) provide support as antioxidants, in cardiovascular protection, for anti-atherosclerosis, to improvement of endothelial function and for anti-inflammation; as well as supporting, anti-apoptosis, anti-aging, anti carcinogen, anti-microbial and neurological protection (Han, 2007). Pure anthocyanins are up to seven times more effective as antioxidants inhibiting lipid peroxidation than alpha tocopherol (Lila, 2004).

     

    Bibliography

    • Cani et al. (2009). Changes in gut microbiota control inflammation in obese mice through a mechanism involving GLP-2 driven improvement of gut permeability. Gut; 58(8): 1091-1103.
    • Cani et al. (2008). Changes in gut microbiotia control metabolic endotoxemia-induced inflammation in high-fat induced obesity and diabetes in mice, Diabetes; 57: 1470-81.
    • Cani et al. (2007). Metabolic endotoxemia initiates obesity and insulin resistance. Diabetes; 56:1761-72.
    • Cani et al. (2007a). Selective increases of Bifidobacteria in gut microflora improve high-fat-diet-induced diabetes in mice through a mechanism associated with endotoxaemia. Diabetologia; 50: 2374-83.
    • DiRienzo DB. (2014). Effect of probiotics on biomarkers of cardiovascular disease: implications for heart-healthy diets. Nutr Rev; 72(1): 18-29.
    • Dinstel RR, Cascio J, Koukel S. (2013). The antioxidant level of Alaska's wild berries: high, higher and highest. Int J Circumpolar Health;72 doi:10.3402/ijch.v7210.21188.
    • Lilla MA. (2004). Plant Pigments and their Manipulation: Annual Plant Reviews; Vol. 14: Chapter 8, Blackwell Publishing.
    • Han et al. (2007). Meta-analysis: Dietary Polyphenols and their Biological Significance. Int J Mo Sci; 8(9): 950-988.
    • Saini et al. (2010). Potential of probiotics in controlling cardiovascular diseases. J Cariovasc Dis Res; 1(4): 213-214.
    • Tuso et al. (2013). Nutritional Update for Physicians: Plant-Based Diets. The Permanente Journal; 17(2); 61-66.
    • Weggemans et al. (2001). Dietary cholesterol from eggs increases the ratio of total cholesterol to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol in humans: a meta-analysis. Am J Clin Nutr; 73: 885-91.
    • Whitehead et al. (2014). Cholesterol-lowering effects of oat beta glucan: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Am J Clin Nutr; 100(6): 1413-1421.

     

    Sincerely yours,

    Seann Bardell

    We have developed our products based on scientific research and/or the practical experience of many healthcare practitioners.  There is a growing body of literature on food based nutrition and supplements and their application in support of our health. Please use our products under the advisement of your doctor.

    Green Facts:

    Globe_Home 3

    Both the World Health Organization (WHO) and Kaiser Permantente, the largest managed healthcare organization in the United States, recommend changing our diet to one that is a plant-based diet in order to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease.

    In 2010 the World Health Organization (WHO) put out their Global Status Report On Noncommunicable Diseases stating,Noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) are the leading causes of death globally, killing more people each year that all other causes combined … NCDs are caused by four behavioral risk factors: tobacco use, unhealthy diet, insufficient physical activity and the harmful use of alcohol … Of the 57 million global deaths in 2008, 36 million, were due to NCDs, principally cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, cancer and chronic respiratory diseases ...Adequate consumption of fruit and vegetables reduces the risk for cardiovascular diseases ... High consumption of saturated fats and trans-fatty acids is linked to heart disease.Heart disease is still the number one killer (CDC April 2016).

    Kaiser Permantente has published a remarkable nutritional update for their 15,000 physicians who care for their 10 million members.  Kaiser is now telling doctors that healthy eating may best be achieved with a plant-based diet, defined as a regiment that "encourages whole, plant-based foods and discourages meats, dairy and eggs as well as all refined and processed junk food (Tuso, 2013)."
  • Endotoxemia effect on weight gain

    Dear Friends

    What is the correlation between processed foods, endotoxemia, and weight gain?

    Cani and associates (2008) found that bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) levels set the tone of insulin sensitivity and the onset of obesity and diabetes. An increased gut permeability allowed for the passage of LPS through the gut wall into the systemic circulation.  Thus, lowering plasma LPS concentration could be a potent strategy for the control of metabolic diseases.

    LPS are large molecules that are found in the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, and elicit strong immune responses in animals.

    I'll discuss a handy protocol below based on some exciting fiber and probiotic research.

    The following diagram from Cani (2008)graphically spells out the chain of events.

    Leaky Gut Cascade

     Food Science

    "This graph shows that changes in the gut microbiota controls endotoximia, inflammation, and associated disorders by a mechanism that increases intestinal permeability" (Cani, 2008).

    Cani (2007, 2007a, 2008, 2009) demonstrated in their research that adding to the diet soluble fibers such as inulin (containing oligofructose chains) stimulates the growth of Bifidobacteria sp. which caused a reduction in gut permeability, thereby reducing the levels of LPS systemically, and resulted in weight loss and reduced metabolic disorders.

    A Therapeutic Food protocol for adding bifidobacteria and fiber (inulin) for the reduction and prevention of Obesity and Diabetes:

    Pick one of these excellent sources for daily dosaging.

    Direction:  Pick from any of these three products of probiotics, which contain large amounts of bifidobacteria and inulin.

    Bibliography

    • Cani et al. (2009). Changes in gut microbiota control inflammation in obese mice through a mechanism involving GLP-2 driven improvement of gut permeability. Gut; 58(8): 1091-1103.
    • Cani et al. (2008). Changes in gut microbiota control metabolic endotoxemia-induced inflammation in high-fat induced obesity and diabetes in mice, Diabetes; 57:1470-81.
    • Cani et al. (2007). Metabolic endotoxemia initiates obesity and insulin resistance. Diabetes; 56:1761-72.
    • Cani et al. (2007a). Selective increases of Bifidobacteria in gut microflora improve high-fat-diet-induced diabetes in mice through a mechanism associated with endotoxaemia. Diabetologia; 50: 2374-83.

    Sincerely yours,

    Seann Bardell

    We have developed our products based on scientific research and/or the practical experience of many healthcare practitioners.  There is a growing body of literature on food based nutrition and supplements and their application in support of our health. Please use our products under the advisement of your doctor.

    Green Facts:

    Globe_Home 3

    Which country in the world has the highest percentage of obese citizens?
    The Kingdom of Tonga with 68.7% obesity, and over 30% diabetes.  Their daily diet, an exceedingly high fatty corn beef, along with high starch sweet potatoes.  For snacks the Tongans love to frequently munch on lamb flap which contain 50% fat.  See Matoto et al. (2014). Burden and spectrum of disease in people with diabetes in Tonga. Public Health Action; 4: S44-S49.
  • Bifidobacteria and reduction of Obesity

    Dear Friends

    Is there a correlation between obesity and low levels of bifidobacteria?

    Cani and associates (2007, 2007a, 2008, 2009) found a clear correlation between the bifidogenic power of oligofructose, and the importance of maintaining healthy levels of bifidobacterial populations for the reduction of obesity and diabetes.

    An incredible chain of events happens when we eat a high fat diet. First, the gut flora changes, as seen in reduction in levels of Bifidobacteria, causing an increase in GI tract permeability. Increased permeability then allows for more LPS absorption, which brings about endotoxemia, a rise in inflammation, and the all too known manifestation of the metabolic disorders of obesity and diabetes.

    Cani et al. found bifidobacteria and oligofructose (the prebiotic inulin) reduce and prevent obesity and diabetes.

    Therapeutic Food protocol to support the reduction and prevention of Obesity and Diabetes:

    Direction:  Pick from any of these three synbiotic products, all of which contain large amounts of bifidobacteria and inulin (oligofructose).  A synbiotic product contains probiotic and prebiotic.

    Bibliography

    • Cani et al. (2009). Changes in gut microbiota control inflammation in obese mice through a mechanism involving GLP-2 driven improvement of gut permeability. Gut; 58(8): 1091-1103.
    • Cani et al. (2008). Changes in gut microbiota control metabolic endotoxemia-induced inflammation in high-fat induced obesity and diabetes in mice, Diabetes; 57:1470-81.
    • Cani et al. (2007). Metabolic endotoxemia initiates obesity and insulin resistance. Diabetes; 56:1761-72.
    • Cani et al. (2007a). Selective increases of Bifidobacteria in gut microflora improve high-fat-diet-induced diabetes in mice through a mechanism associated with endotoxaemia. Diabetologia; 50: 2374-83.

     

    Sincerely yours,

    Seann Bardell

    We have developed our products based on scientific research and/or the practical experience of many healthcare practitioners.  There is a growing body of literature on food based nutrition and supplements and their application in support of our health. Please use our products under the advisement of your doctor.

     

    Green Facts:

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    Jamie Oliver's Food Revolution is rolling out again and more powerfully than ever.  They're launching a new hub—your go-to-place for daily updates, new information and stories from around the world.
  • Garlic Douche: an ancient art

    Dear Friends

    An old and natural practice to treat vaginal yeast infections is the vaginal douche using a good collection of lactic acid bacteria, such as the Lactobacillus species found within our Original Synbiotic formula, along with a clove of freshly reacted garlic in warmish water. The following protocol makes this an easy process:

    We've seen in our April 24th Forward Thinking and earlier in the April 12th newsletter that according to current research certain Lactobacillus species taken orally with garlic can be a very effective protocol for treating both vaginosis and candidiasis respectively.  Click on their links to see these references.

    The Art of Douche: for Candidiasis and Vaginosis Support

     

    Direction:  First, pour the whole garlic clove powder from one 400mg capsule into 2 cups of water, stir and let the garlic react for a minute as the allicin forms.  Then mix in 1 to 2 tsp of the Original Synbiotic.  That's it.  Make this your douching ingredients. Douche for 2 to 6 days. Wash carefully the outer area after douching.

    Bibliography

    • Cohain, JS. (2003). How to Treat a Vaginal Infection with a Clove of Garlic. Midwifery Today; Issue 38.
    • Drago et al. (2007). Activity of a Lactobacillus acidophilus-Based Douche for the Treatment of Bacterial Vaginosis. Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine; 13(4): 435-438.

    Sincerely yours,

    Seann Bardell

    We have developed our products based on scientific research and/or the practical experience of many healthcare practitioners.  There is a growing body of literature on food based nutrition and supplements and their application in support of our health. Please use our products under the advisement of your doctor.

     

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    "We can change climate change—join us and spread the word!  We'll keep you posted on the film and more ways you can help."
    The future of our climate is in crisis.  Watch this trailer on the film by charles Ferguson:  It's Time to Choose.
  • Bacterial Vaginosis Support

    Dear Friends

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is the most common cause of vaginal symptoms among women.  According to NHANES, data collected between 2001–2004, 29.2% of women ages 14–49 in the United States have BV.  84% of these women with are asymptomatic (Koumans, 2007). Women with BV have an increased risk of miscarriage, preterm labor and delivery, and postpartum infections.

    Diagnosis via vaginal swab (wet mount), whiff test, vaginal pH, oligonucleotide probe of DNA of bacteria present are standard. Bacterial vaginosis usually causes the vaginal pH to rise above 4.5 due to the microbial species present. Diagnosis of BV is difficult because of its complex polymicrobial nature indicative of dysbiosis.

    BV has high relapse rates and associated complications.  BV diagnosis includes a decrease in vaginal lactobacilli species and increase in the anaerobes population of microbes, including, most commonly Gardnerella vaginosis or A.vaginae (Shipitsyn,2013).  Vaginal bacterial communities differ dramatically between healthy patients and patients with BV, with G. vaginalis present in over 90% of BV cases (Verstraelen & Swidsinski, 2013).  G. vaginalis is up to 70% of asymptomatic healthy women. When G. vaginalis biofilms form they can establish synergistic relationships with other pathogenic anaerobes.

    A Therapeutic Food protocol for Bacterial Vaginosis Support

    • Cranberry Pomegranate Synbiotic: 2-3 capsules bid to tid
    • Beta High Potency Synbiotic Glucan: 1-2 tsp at night before bed in water.
    • Garlic, organic: 1-2 capsules 1-tid
    • Be Regular: 1-2 servings as needed for regularity.
    • Phyto Power: 1-2 capsules bid to tid.

    Food Science

    Probiotics

    • The probiotic species Lactobacillus are the more common normal vaginal flora that help to protect the vagina against infection by maintaining a normal vaginal pH through lactic acid fermentation of glucose and glycogen and hydrogen peroxide production (Steece, 2011).
    • A Cochrane review (2005) noted 2 studies that reported a beneficial effect of probiotics in the treatment of BV.  In one study cure rates for BV treated with Lactobacilli at 30 days were 60% (P = 0.004) and 88% (P < 0.005), more than double the effect of controls.  Another trial reported a 35% reduction in recurrent episodes of BV compared with placebo (Barrons, 2008).
    • Reid et al (2001) found that of the 60% of women with asymptomatic Bacterial Vaginosis as diagnosed by a Nugent scoring, and 90% of symptomatic women with BV reverted to normal after 28 days of taking oral Lactobacillus species.  7 out of 11 women with symptomatic BV converted to normal after one month on the probiotics.
    • A clinical trial by Karkut G (1984) found that 80% of women with nonspecific vaginitis who used an intravaginal lactobacillus preparation had improvement or resolution of symptoms.
    • A controlled trial by Shaleev (1996) of women with recurrent BV or vaginal candidiasis that ate 5 ounces of yogurt containing live Lactobacillus acidophilus daily had more than a 50% reduction in recurrences, while women who consumed pasteurized yogurt that did not contain the bacteria had only a slight reduction.
    • An in vitro study by McMillian et al (2011) found that biofilms mimicking aerobic vaginosis, BV and UTI with Escherichia coli, Atopobium vaginae and Gardnerella vaginalis  were affected by lactobacillus probiotic administration. Lactobacillus killed E. coli and secreted products of L. rhamnosus GR-1 decreased E. coli cell density, and increased cell death. BV biofilms with Lactobacilli infiltrated BV biofilms and caused bacterial cell death, while Metronidazole produced holes in the biofilm but did not eradicate the organisms.

    Note:  In terms of the probiotic organisms the Cranberry Pomegranate Synbiotic contains L. acidophilus, L. casei (both important beneficial vaginal organisms) and B. longum; and the Beta Glucan Synbiotic contains L. acidophilus, L. rhamnosus, L. plantarum, S. thermophilus and B. longum.  Click their links here to see the full formulas.

    Garlic

    • A randomized clinical trial in Iran by Mohammadzadeh et al. (2014) of 120 married women aged 18 to 44 with BV by Amsel’s were treated with either garlic tablet or oral metronidazole for seven days. Amsel’s criteria were significantly decreased after treatment with garlic or metronidazole (70% and 48.3%, respectively; P < 0.001). Therapeutic effects of garlic on BV were similar to that of metronidazole (63.3% and 48.3%, respectively; P = 0.141). There were significant differences between the two treatment groups in terms of side effects; metronidazole was associated with more complications (P = 0.032).

     

    Bibliography

    • Barrons, R, Tassone, D. (2008). Use of Lactobacillus Probiotics for Bacterial Genitourinary Infections in Women: A Review. Clinical Therapeutics, 30(3): 453-468.
    • Chierico, FD, Vernocchi, P, Bonizz,i, L, Carsetti  R., Castellazzi,,B, Dallapiccola, AM, de Vos,, W, Guerzoni, ME, Manco, M, Marseglia, GL, Muraca M, Roncada, P, Salvatori, G, Signore, F, Urbani, A, Putignani, L (2012).  Early-life gut microbiota under physiological and pathological conditions: The central role of combined meta-omics-based approaches. Journal of Proteomics Translational Proteomics, 15(3):4580-4587.
    • Koumans EH, Sternberg M, Bruce C, McQuillan G, Kendrick J, Sutton M, Markowitz LE. (2007)  The prevalence of bacterial vaginosis in the United States, 2001-2004; associations with symptoms, sexual behaviors, and reproductive health.Sex Transm Dis, 34(11):864-9.
    • Mcmillan, A, Dell, M, Zellar, MP, Cribby, S, Martz, S, Hong, E Fu, J, Abbas, A, Dang, T, Miller, W, Reid, G. (2011). Disruption of urogenital biofilms by lactobacilli. Colloids and Surfaces B: Biointerfaces, 86:58-64.
    • Mohammadzadeh, F., Dolatian, M., Jorjani, M., Alavi Majd, H., & Borumandnia, N. (2014). Comparing the Therapeutic Effects of Garlic Tablet and Oral Metronidazole on Bacterial Vaginosis: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial. Iranian Red Crescent Medical Journal, 16(7), e19118. http://doi.org/10.5812/ircmj.19118
    • Money, D. (2005). The laboratory diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis. The Canadian Journal of Infectious Diseases & Medical Microbiology, 16(2), 77–79.
    • Reid G, Beuerman, D, Heinemann C, Bruce, AW. (2001). Probiotic Lactobacillus dose required to restore and maintain a normal vaginal flora. FEMS Immunology and Medical Microbiology; 32: 37-41.
    • Shalev E, Battino S, Weiner E, et al. (1996) Ingestion of yogurt containing Lactobacillus acidophilus compared with pasteurized yogurt as prophylaxis for recurrent Candidal vaginitis and bacterial vaginosis. Arch Fam Med, 5:593–6.
    • Shipitsyna, E., Roos, A., Datcu, R., Hallén, A., Fredlund, H., Jensen, J. S., Unemo, M. (2013). Composition of the Vaginal Microbiota in Women of Reproductive Age – Sensitive and Specific Molecular Diagnosis of Bacterial Vaginosis Is Possible? PLoS ONE, 8(4), e60670. http://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0060670.
    • Steece, R. (2011). Bacterial Vaginosis, Vulvovaginal Candidiasis, and Trichomoniasis. Society of Armed Forces Medical Laboratory Scientists (SAFMLS). Presented on March 28-31, 2011 New Orleans, Louisiana.

     

    Sincerely yours,
    Seann Bardell
    We have developed our products based on scientific research and/or the practical experience of many healthcare practitioners.  There is a growing body of literature on food based nutrition and supplements and their application in support of our health.  Please use our products under the advisement of your doctor.

     

    Green Facts:

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    Biomimicry says Happy Earth Day to you from all over the world.
    Meet the nature-inspired innovators shaking up our food system.
  • 10% Gift to celebrate Earth Day

    Dear Friends

    In honor of Earth Day we are offering 10% off on any BioImmersion orders today and through the weekend.  Simply call 425-451-3112 to place those orders.

    Let's celebrate Earth Day!!!   Here's the link: Earth Day — April 22.

    The year of the first Earth Day was 1970, and it gave voice to an emerging consciousness that we all need to come together to make critical changes in our environmental practices. Here we are, it's 2016, and this reality is clearer and more urgent than ever.

    The Earth Day Network is working to protect our planet every day of the year, with tens of thousands of partners across 192 countries.  We're at a critical moment in the fight to defend the health of our planet. (The Earth Day Network: Join the Movement)

    Sincerely yours,
    Seann Bardell
    We have developed our products based on scientific research and/or the practical experience of many healthcare practitioners.  There is a growing body of literature on food based nutrition and supplements and their application in support of our health.  Please use our products under the advisement of your doctor.

     

    Green Facts:

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    More on the Earth Day Celebration through the Rocky Mountains Institute's video discussion of the importance results from the Paris Climate Summit.
  • UTI Support

    Dear Friends

    Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs) are the most common non-intestinal infection worldwide (August, 2012). It is estimated that 60% of women have had at least one UTI, 30% have recurrent UTIs.

    Recurrent infections occur in 35 to 53% of women that are treated for UTI within 12 months with conventional antibiotic treatments and incur a cost of approximately 2.47 billion dollars in 2000 for women in the United States (Kranjčec, 2014).

    Conventional therapy to prevent recurrent UTIs are long-term antibiotic prophylaxis or postcoital antibiotics, which present with a high reoccurrence rate, lead to antibiotic resistance, increase the risk of candida and dysbiosis and disrupt the microbiome of women with potential deleterious side effects.

    A Therapeutic Food protocol for UTI:

    • Cranberry Pomegranate Synbiotic- 2-3 capsules BID to TID, preventatively.
    • Garlic, organic- 1-2 capsules BID to TID.
    • For bowel regularity, choice of:
    • Beta Glucan High Potency Synbiotic- tsp. at night before bed in water.
    • Be Regular- 1-2 tbs as needed for regularity.
    • For liver and antioxidant support:
    • Phyto Power- 1-2 capsules BID to TID.

     

    Food Science

    Cranberry juice and cranberry extracts were traditionally used for the prevention and treatment of UTIs in early Native American medicine.  A review of the literature on cranberry extract, probiotics, and D-mannose all have clinical evidence to support their use in the prevention of UTIs and are found synergistically in Cranberry Pomegranate Synbiotic to prevent UTIs without contributing to the dybiosis and antibiotic resistance produced by standard antibiotic therapy.

    • Cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon, Ericaceae), cranberry extracts and proanthocyanidins, and the sugar found in high concentrations in cranberries, D-mannose, inhibit the adherence of E. coli, the bacteria that is most commonly found to contribute to UTIs, to the urinary tract wall. The condensed tannins also prevent uropathogenic phenotypes of P-fimbriated (mannose-resistant) E. coli from adhering to the urinary tract according to its German Commission E monograph, a peer-reviewed monograph used for therapeutic application of natural medicines in Europe.
    • Cranberry juice has been shown to have antibacterial effects against Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Proteus mirabilis. A survey of 400 Norwegian women by Nordeng (2004) found that cranberry was the most commonly used herb during pregnancy with no adverse effects with regular consumption.
    • A review by Oppel (2008) concluded that cranberry is effective in preventing UTIs in pregnant and breastfeeding women, except for those at risk of developing kidney stones because of its high oxalate content.
    • A study by Kontiokari T, et al. (2001) reviewed research that found cranberry extract 500 mg twice daily of cranberry extract containing 9 mg proanthocyanidins reduced the odds of bacteriuria and pyuria by 42% compared to placebo, reduced the risk of developing a UTI in high-risk patients compared to placebo (62.8% vs 84.8%) when taking 300-600 mL or more of cranberry juice.
    • In Kontiokari T, et al. (2001) randomized clinical study 150 women were randomly assigned to receive 50 mL of cranberry-lingonberry juice daily, and found the number of patients who had recurrent infections was significantly lower in the cranberry-lingonberry group than in the lactobacillus or control groups (12 compared to 21 and 19). The authors concluded that the cranberry-lingonberry drink was associated with a 20 percent reduction in absolute risk of UTI compared with control participants.
    • A 6-month intervention trial published in Nutraceutical Business & Technology (2011) sponsored study by a cranberry extract company showed that a daily dose of 500 mg of cranberry extract in 165 women with a history of recurrent UTIs reduced the UTI recurrence by 15%.
    • A randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind study conducted in Japan by Takahashi et al. (2013) found that women that drank (125 mL) of cranberry juice before going to sleep for 24 weeks had a significant decrease in the rate of relapse of UTI ( 29.1% versus 49.2%) compared to the control group.
    • A clinical trial (Beerepoot, 2011) of 221 premenopausal women showed that continuous antibiotics were more effective in preventing recurrent UTIs than 500 mg cranberry capsules taken twice daily, at the expense of emerging antibiotic resistance.
    • A retrospective review of clinical studies by Miceli et; al (2014) on cranberry products strongly support their prophylactic use in young and middle-aged women.
    • A randomized controlled study by Bonetta (2012) of 370 patients with prostate cancer undergoing irradiation to the pelvis found a significant reduction in UTIs (8.7%) compared with controls (24.2%) accompanied by a statistically significant reduction in urinary tract symptoms (dysuria, nocturia, urinary frequency, urgency), suggesting a generally protective effect of cranberry extract on the bladder mucosa.


    D-Mannose
    binds to the type 1 pili of enteric bacteria blocking their adhesion to uroepithelial cells, and reduction in bacteriuria levels have been confirmed in in vivo animal model. In laboratory studies D-mannose components had prebiotic activity in promoting non-pathogen probiotics and thus may additionally contribute to the prevention of recurrence of UTIs by addressing the dysbiosis common in patients with recurrent UTIs and Intercystial cystitis.

    • A randomized study by Kranjčec (2014) of 308 women with history of recurrent UTI and acute cystitis that took antibiotics previously were randomly allocated to three groups. The first group (n = 103) received prophylaxis with 2 g of D-mannose powder in 200 ml of water daily for 6 months, the second (n = 103) received 50mg Nitrofurantoin daily, and the third (n = 102) did not receive prophylaxis. 31.8 % had recurrent UTI: 15 (14.6%) in the D-mannose group, 21 (20.4%) in Nitrofurantoin group, and 62 (60.8%) in no prophylaxis group. Patients in D-mannose group had a significantly lower risk of recurrent UTI episode during prophylactic therapy compared to patients in no prophylaxis group. Patients in D-mannose group had a significantly lower risk of side effects compared to patients in Nitrofurantoin group.

     

    Probiotics have been shown to be clinically effective in UTI treatment and to prevent antibiotic-induced dysbiosis. 

    • A randomized, controlled, clinical study of 252 postmenopausal women in the Netherlands (Beerepot, MAJ, et al. 2012) with recurrent UTIs showed oral doses of 1 billion colony-forming units of Lactobacillus species were as effective as 12 months of prophylaxis with trimethoprim- sulfamethoxazole, 480 mg without leading to antibiotic resistance associated with antibiotic use.
    • Another study by Reid, Hammond, and Bruce (2003) showed that taking probiotics at 10 billion of L rhamnosus and L Fermentum RC14 from the day starting antibiotics and for 21 days subsequently significantly reduced the risk of developing bacterial vaginosis.
    • Lactobacillus species were shown to inhibit candida albicans and Gardneralla vaginalis species in vitro.
    • Other studies that have shown small benefit with using L. thermophilus and L Bulgaricus, and L. GG (which is a rhamnosus sp.) to prevent BV nor vaginal candidiasis.
    • A clinical study of 100 premenopausal women with a history of at least one UTI by Stapelton (2011) found a significant reduction in the incidence of recurrent UTIs in women receiving intravaginal lactobacillus as compared to those in the placebo group.


    Garlic
    has been researched extensively for its antibacterial properties that do not contribute to antibiotic resistance.

    • Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that colonizes urinary catheters, forms biofilms, and is responsible for causing persistent and recurrent nosocomial catheter-associated urinary tract infections (UTIs) with increased morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised patients. Antimicrobial resistance to P. aeruginosa is common. In a mouse model of UTIs by Harjai (2010) oral treatment with garlic significantly lowered renal bacterial counts and protected mouse kidney from tissue destruction. In vitro data showed decreased elaboration of virulence factors and reduced production of quorum-sensing signals by P. aeruginosa in the presence of fresh garlic extract.
    • Recurrent UTIs with a positive E. coli culture, not improving with antibiotics are common due to the development of antibiotic resistance. Monsour et. al (2014) found that an alternative therapeutic regimen based on parsley and garlic, L-arginine, probiotics, and cranberry tablets showed a significant health improvement and symptoms relief without recurrence for more than 12 months.


    Be Regular-
    A contributing factor to UTIs is constipation and dysbiosis of the colonic bacteria.  Including prebiotic and fiber found in Be Regular helps to prevent recurrent UTI infections by promoting non-pathogenic commensal probiotics and the elimination of pathogenic bacteria from the stool.

    Phyto Power is included in the protocol because it is high in phytonutrients that aid in elimination of toxins that contribute to dysbiois and rose hips that are high in Vitamin C to protect against oxidative damage as part of the metabolic pathways.

    Bibliography:

    • August, S. L., & De Rosa, M. J. (2012). Evaluation of the Prevalence of Urinary Tract Infection in Rural Panamanian Women. PLoS ONE; 7(10), e47752. http://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0047752
    • Beachey EH. (1981). Bacterial adherence: adhesion-receptor interactions mediating the attachment of bacteria to mucosal surface. J Infect Dis;143:325-345.
    • Beerepoot MA, ter Riet G, Nys S, van der Wal WM, de Borgie CA, de Reijke TM et al. (2011). Cranberries vs. antibiotics to prevent urinary tract infections: a randomized double-blind noninferiority trial in premenopausal women. Arch Intern Med; 171(14): 1270–1278.
    • Beerepoot et al. (2012). Lactobacilli vs. Antibiotics to Prevent Urinary Tract Infections: A Randomized, Double-blind, Noninferiority Trial in Postmenopausal Women. Arch Intern Med; 172(9):704-712.
    • Blumenthal et al. (1998). The Complete German Commission E Monographs Therapeutic Guide to Herbal Medicines. Austin, TX: American Botanical Council; Boston: Integrative Medicine Communications.
    • Bonetta A, Di Pierro, F. (2012).  Enteric-coated, highly standardized cranberry extract reduces risk of UTIs and urinary symptoms during radiotherapy for prostate carcinoma.  Dove Medical Press; 4: 281-286.
    • Dugoua et al. (2008). Safety and efficacy of cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) during pregnancy and lactation. Can J Clin Pharmacol; 15( 1): e80-e86. Epub Jan 18, 2008.
    • Harjai, K., Kumar, R. and Singh, S. (2010), Garlic blocks quorum sensing and attenuates the virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. FEMS Immunology & Medical Microbiology, 58: 161–168. doi: 10.1111/j.1574-695X.2009.00614.x
    • Kontiokari T, et al. (2001). Randomised trial of cranberry-lingon-berry juice and Lactobacillus GG drink for the prevention of urinary tract infections in women. BMJ; 322: 1571–3.
    • Kranjčec, B, Papeš, D, Altarac, S. (2014). D-mannose powder for prophylaxis of recurrent urinary tract infections in women: a randomized clinical trial. World Journal of Urology, 32(1):79-84.
    • Lloyd, Ian,B.Sc(Pharm), C.H. (2014). Cranberry and prevention of UTIs. Pharmacy Practice; 1(10): 95. Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com/docview/1623072718?accountid=26484
    • Mansour et al. (2014). Efficient and Cost-Effective Alternative Treatment for Recurrent Urinary Tract Infections and Interstitial Cystitis in Women: A Two-Case Report. Case Reports in Medicine ; Article ID 698758 : 4 pages. doi:10.1155/2014/698758.
    • Micali et al. (2014).  Cranberry and recurrent cystitis: more than marketing? Crit Rev Food Sci Nutr; 54(8): 1063–1075.
    • Nordeng H, Havnen GC. (2004). Use of herbal drugs in pregnancy: a survey among 400 Norwegian women. Pharmacoepidemiol Drug Saf; 13(6): 371-380.
    • Oppel, M. (2008). Cranberry Effective in Treating UTIs during Pregnancy and Lactation. Herbalgram; (80): 31.
    • Reid, G., Hammond, JA, Bruce, AW. (2003). Effect of Lactobacilli Oral Supplement on the Vaginal Microflora of Antibiotic Treated Patients: Randomized Placebo-controlled Study. Nutraceutials and Food; 8: 1-4.
    • Shalev E, Battino S, Weiner E, et al. (1996). Ingestion of yogurt containing Lactobacillus acidophilus compared with pasteurized yogurt as prophylaxis for recurrent Candidal vaginitis and bacterial vaginosis. Arch Fam Med; 5: 593–6.
    • Stapleton AE, Dziura J, Hooton TM, Cox ME, Yarova-Yarovaya Y, Chen S et al (2012). Recurrent urinary tract infection and urinary Escherichia coli in women ingesting cranberry juice daily: a random- ized controlled trial. Mayo Clin Proc; 87(2):143–150 .
    • Takahashi , S, Hamasuna, R., Yasuda, M, Arakawa, S., Tanaka, S, Ishikawa, S, Kiyota, H, Hayami, H, Yamamoto, S. (2013).  A randomized clinical trial to evaluate the preventive effect of cranberry juice (UR65) for patients with recurrent urinary tract infection. Journal of Infection and Chemotherapy; 19 (1): 112-117.
    • Terris MK, Issa MM, Tacker JR. (2001). Dietary supplementation with cranberry concentrate tablets may increase the risk of nephrolithiasis. Urology; 57(1): 26-29.
    • Whole cranberry powder prevents recurrent UTIs women. (2011). Nutraceutical Business & Technology, 7(5), 10. Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com/docview/928970880?accountid=26484)
     As I promised last week, within our Forward Thinking presentation of a Candidiasis Support protocol, over the next few weeks we are giving you successful recipes developed and used by Dr. Artemis Morris; and this week we have her UTI protocol using the Therapeutic Foods.
    Sincerely yours,
    Seann Bardell
    We have developed our products based on scientific research and/or the practical experience of many healthcare practitioners.  There is a growing body of literature on food based nutrition and supplements and their application in support of our health.  Please use our products under the advisement of your doctor.

    Green Facts:

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    Watch this truly inspiring TED talk by Ron Finley—The Gangsta Gardener.   Ron feeds the hungry, and brings real food to the people that need it most.
    He also will be a speaker in the 2016 Food Revolution Summit.

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